Student Research Opportunities

Science and Engineering Scholars conduct food science research.
Science and Engineering Scholars conduct food science research.

Food Science majors take advantage of formal and informal research experiences internships, and study abroad opportunities. Nearly all food science courses have a laboratory component. Undergraduate and graduate students benefit from one-on-one time with faculty members, developing hands-on skills through individual research projects. Undergraduates may volunteer, be paid, or obtain academic credit for research. Several formal programs are available that support undergraduate research, including the USDA Scholars Program and the Science and Engineering Scholars (SES) Program.

Due to the mentoring and research opportunities they experience as students, graduates often find jobs in the food science field with little trouble. Graduates of the program take advantage of UD’s network with the food industry, moving on to careers in flavor testing, packaging research, product development, food safety, and quality assurance. Frequently internship opportunities have ended in an offer for fulltime employment. Undergraduates often pursue master’s and doctoral degrees in food chemistry, process engineering, food microbiology, chemistry, and molecular biology.

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Food science students take advantage of extensive study abroad programs offered throughout UD. The Department of Animal and Food Sciences routinely offers sessions in Australia, Antarctica, Brazil, Costa Rica, Ecuador and the Galapagos Islands, New Zealand, and Tanzania. A prior program, led by food science faculty Dr. Sue Snider, took students to New Zealand to compare the U.S. food system from production to consumption with that of another country. The trip gave students concrete ways to think about different points of view on food systems as well as related issues, such as biotechnology and food irradiation.

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