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Fighting Poisons With Bacteria

 The effort to save rice is but one use of microbial bacteria in protecting or enhancing agricultural plants. Credit Harsh Bais/University of Delaware
The effort to save rice is but one use of microbial bacteria in protecting or enhancing agricultural plants. Credit Harsh Bais/University of Delaware

Excerpt from The New York Times

When Harsh Bais grows rice plants in trays of water in his greenhouse at the University of Delaware, he can easily spot the ones that have been exposed to arsenic: They are stunted, with shorter stems and shrunken, yellow-tinged leaves.

Dr. Bais is working to develop rice plants that take up less arsenic, a common contaminant in the fields of his native India and other Asian countries. Chronic exposure to arsenic has been linked to heart disease, diabetes and genetic damage associated with elevated risk for cancer.

Read more on The New York Times website.

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