New issue of University of Delaware Research magazine now available

New issue of University of Delaware Research magazine now availableThe latest issue of the University of Delaware Research magazine profiles seven women researchers who offer insight into their work — from coral reefs to corporations — the hurdles they have cleared and what keeps them moving forward. Each researcher also talks about what inspires her work in a short video in the online edition.

Cathy Wu says her father, and especially one of his many letters, inspired her to pursue her master’s and doctoral degrees. That combination of computer science and biology unknowingly positioned her to be a pioneer in a field that uses computer science tools to make sense of massive amounts of biological data.

Angelia Seyfferth, assistant professor in the Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, is featured from the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources and talks about how she first got involved with research and her current research focus on arsenic in rice.

Seyfferth says she enjoys knowing the research she is conducting has the potential to impact society. She also loves passing that knowledge on to new students.

“Both of those things really drive me on a daily basis,” says Seyfferth. “I get to work with students and get them excited about research. I enjoy getting young people involved in research at an early age because it was so critical for me to get to where I am today.”

Other highlights of the issue include:

  • Spin In, a program developed by UD’s Office of Economic Innovation and Partnerships, which is giving students the opportunity to work alongside entrepreneurs on cool inventions like mTrigger, PocketFarmer and FanDeck;
  • Groundbreaking humanities research that is bringing the forgotten slaves of the Roman Empire into new focus;
  • MADE CLEAR, a model program developed by UD and the University of Maryland with National Science Foundation support, to help teachers integrate climate change education into multiple areas of instruction;
  • The Institute of Energy Conversion’s quest to capture more sun power through pioneering work in solar technology; and
  • Fearsome Fridays — the Test Your Knowledge quiz.

UD Research is published three times a year through a collaboration of the Research Office and Communications and Public Affairs.

Click here to view the latest issue of the magazine.

To subscribe, visit this webpage.