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Celtis laevigata

Sugar Hackberry

Pronunciation
SEL-tiss LAY-vee-gah-tuh
Family
Genus
Nativity

Virginia to Florida, west to Illinois

Growth Habit

Rounded to broad rounded with spreading, often pendulous branches.

Hardiness
5
Culture

Low wet soils, floodplains, full sun and wet-dry soils

Facultative Status
Facultative Upland
Landscape Use

Attractive to wildlife

Foliage

Alternate, simple, oblong-lanceolate; entire margin, dark green and glabrous; turning to yellow in the fall.

Buds

Buds are tightly appressed to stem, tightly pointed and pubescent

Bark

Resembles C. occidentalis but without the wart-like protrusions

Flower

Insignificant, mostly monoecious, greenish flowers appear in spring (April-May), with male flowers in clusters and female flowers solitary.

Fruit

Orange-red to blue-black, very sweet and juicy, and relished by birds.

Propagation

Seed, cuttings.

Pests
None serious. Hackberry nipple gall can significally disgifure the leaves.
Cultivars

Bill Wandell's 'All Season's Sugarberry' - has an excellent, well-balanced crown, full and fine-textured, small lustrous green leaves that turn good yellow in the fall, smooth American Beech-like bark, excellent growth under adverse city conditions and cold hardiness.

Cross between C. laevigata — C. occidentalis called 'Magnifica' - does not develop witches' broom, is drought resistant, salt tolerant and withstands low oxygen tensions.

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