Reminders By Year

Each year, there are critically important opportunities and suggestions that we recommend to you as a Pre-Veterinary Medicine and Animal Bioscience major. Veterinary colleges seek students that are not only academically strong but are well-rounded in all aspects of their life. Here are a few of our suggestions:

  • In the fall, make an appointment with your academic advisor to introduce yourself. Get to know them. Remember, they will most likely be someone you will ask to write a recommendation letter for you.
  • Join a club or club sport! Extra-curricular and co-curricular organizations help develop leadership skills.
  • Form a study group for ANFS 101, CHEM 103 and/or BISC 207.   You can stop at the Office of Academic Enrichment and sign up and they will actually pay a tutor to meet with your study group weekly and help you with your studying!
  • Check out Talk of Townsend on a regular basis for veterinary college or other graduate information.
  • Take advantage of UD’s Career Services Center (CSC) and “Handshake” to schedule appointments, search internship opportunities and sign up for CANR related programming (i.e. resume writing, dining etiquette, interviewing techniques, etc.).
  • If you are going home for winter session, start getting some of your animal or veterinary experience. You can volunteer at a shelter or rescue, or shadow your local veterinarian.
  • In the spring – start applying for summer internships and jobs to get more animal or veterinary experience. Look for opportunities working with agricultural animals or animals that you have not worked with before.
  • In the spring, consider applying to study abroad (applications usually open in February) for the January winter session of your sophomore year.
  • Spring break – use this time to volunteer in your community and/or with animals. Check out UDAB and VIDA! The Office of Service Learning is a great place for more information and funding ideas.
  • Consider adding a minor, or even a double major.
  • Apply to become an Ag Ambassador.
  • Start a log book to record all of your animal and veterinary experiences.
  • Start a log book to record all of your community service experiences. Students often list community service under club activities on their resume and rarely describe all the different types of service that they do in four years. The reason that this is important is that there are several awards and recognitions that include community service and if you record them all as individual activities rather than just as part of a club, you’ll have a detailed record when being considered for awards and scholarships.
  • In the fall, make an appointment with your academic advisor to update her/him on your interests, experiences and thoughts about veterinary medicine and other options.
  • Form a study group for ORGO (Organic Chemistry)!!!
  • Apply to become an Ag Ambassador.
  • Run for a Committee Chair or other office in your club so you really start to develop and practice your leadership skills.
  • Consider mentoring other students by joining AgCelerate.
  • Finalize your resume during Sophomore Seminar (ANFS …)
  • Check out Talk of Townsend on a regular basis for veterinary college or other graduate information.
  • Take advantage of UD’s Career Services Center (CSC) and “Handshake” to schedule appointments, search internship opportunities and sign up for CANR related programming (i.e. resume writing, dining etiquette, interviewing techniques, etc.).
  • In the spring, consider applying to study abroad (applications usually open in February) for the January winter session of your junior year.
  • Start to think about undergraduate research. If you want to pursue a research project, the summer of your sophomore year is a good time to start. Applications for the Undergraduate Research Summer Scholars are due in early March. You can also pursue research simply by asking a professor (that is studying a topic that you are interested in) if she/he has space for a new undergraduate student in their laboratory and research program!
  • If not doing research over the summer, early spring is a good time to pursue that summer internship or job that will result in more in-depth animal or veterinary experience.
  • Spring break – use this time to volunteer in your community and/or with animals. Check out UDAB and VIDA! You can use spring break to become a certified Artificial Insemination Technician through the Animal Science Club – which will teach you lots of reproductive anatomy!
  • Before you register for fall courses (in April) consider if you would like to apply to be a teaching assistant (TA) for one ANFS 111 or ANFS 140.   You can only serve a TA (ANFS 399) twice during your undergraduate career so if you think you would rather TA for an upper-division course, then don’t apply for ANFS 111 or 140. Wait until you have taken the upper-division course and talk to your professor.
  • Think more about a Plan B. We don’t want you to give up on becoming a veterinarian but we want you to think outside the veterinary box about careers that involve science and animals!   Talk to your advisor about options!
  • Update your animal and veterinary experience and community service logs! Activities like volunteering at an animal shelter can fit into both animal experience and community service!
  • In the fall, make your appointment with your academic advisor to update her/him on your interests, experiences and thoughts about veterinary medicine and other options.
  • Run for a leadership position in the clubs or organizations you’re involved in.
  • Check out Talk of Townsend on a regular basis for veterinary college or other graduate information.
  • Take advantage of UD’s Career Services Center (CSC) and “Handshake” to schedule appointments, search internship opportunities and sign up for CANR related programming (i.e. resume writing, dining etiquette, interviewing techniques, etc.).
  • If you started research in the summer, think about continuing it into fall and developing it into a more detailed project or a senior thesis. Talk to your research mentor.
  • Print up a copy of the VMCAS application and read through it carefully to make sure you know what you have left to accomplish to submit a competitive application.
  • Look into the GREs and think about how many times you would like to take the exam and when you need to schedule the exam to be ready to complete the VMCAS application early in your senior year.
  • In the spring, if you haven’t already participated in study abroad, consider applying to study abroad (applications usually open in February) for the January winter session of your senior year.
  • If not studying abroad in January, winter session is a good time to take a difficult course or to volunteer and get more in more in-depth animal or veterinary experience.
  • Spring break – use this time to volunteer in your community and/or with animals. Check out UDAB and VIDA! You can use spring break to become a certified Artificial Insemination Technician through the Animal Science Club – which will teach you lots of reproductive anatomy!
  • Apply to be a tutor for next year (with the OAE) for one of our undergraduate courses like ANFS 101.
  • If you have not already  TA’ed in two ANFS courses , think about your favorite course thus far and talk to that professor about serving as a TA for that course.
  • At the end of your junior year, reach out to those faculty and staff you feel would be willing to write letters of recommendation for the fall application process. Give these individuals plenty of time to complete your recommendation. The VMCAS site will open over the summer and your application will be due very early in the fall semester. Include a current copy of your resume and the date the recommendation letter is due.
  • Summer after junior year – start writing your personal statement and ask your advisor or one of our second readers if they would be willing to read your statement and critique it for you. You can email the statement – but remember that many faculty attend professional conferences and take vacations in the summer. The application is due quickly in the fall, so if you would like help with your personal statement, start your draft early in the summer of your junior year!
  • Summer after your junior year – fill out the paper application and make a list of what you have left to complete during your senior year.
  • If you decide not to apply to veterinary school, have a plan B, which may include other post- graduate degree options. Use your summer to research graduate programs. Graduate school applications are usually due later than veterinary college applications –in late fall of your senior year.
  • Complete your application to veterinary colleges or to other graduate programs.
  • When all your applications are complete, pat yourself on the back, and take a walk through our botanic gardens and grab a cone of your favorite ice cream at the UDairy Creamery!
  • Check out Talk of Townsend on a regular basis for veterinary college or other graduate information.
  • Take advantage of UD’s Career Services Center (CSC) and “Handshake” to schedule appointments, search internship and career opportunities and sign up for CANR related programming (i.e. resume writing, dining etiquette, interviewing techniques, etc.).
  • Stay engaged in your extra-curricular and co-curricular organizations and activities which provide leadership and mentoring for your peers.
  • Make your appointment with your academic advisor to update her/him on your interests, experiences and thoughts about veterinary medicine and other options.
  • If you are granted an interview – review some of the interviewing information our veterinary alumni have provided you with.
  • Stay focused! Even if you are admitted into your dream veterinary or graduate college, they require a final transcript and will review your final senior grades.
  • Participate in EVERYTHING!
  • Enjoy your senior year!