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Animal Biosciences

Why major in Animal Biosciences?

Animal bioscientists are needed to answer questions related to how animals and animal systems function. They are interested in solving problems related to producing healthy and productive livestock and companion animals such as horses. Students interested in fundamental biology of any kind of animal will find this a focused, hands-on major with a variety of in-demand career options available after graduation. Students that graduate from this major are prepared to pursue post-graduate, research-based degrees (M.S. and/or Ph.D.) in the animal biosciences. The curriculum includes an animal science core (anatomy, nutrition, physiology, health, genetics, and behavior) complemented by animal bioscience interest areas in animal nutrition, animal physiology and animal health.

Uniqueness of our program

Students will develop expertise in the interest area of their choice to enhance their application for graduate programs in that area. The curriculum also includes prerequisite courses suggested for admission to graduate programs in animal science and in biology (calculus, chemistry, organic chemistry, biochemistry, and microbiology). Among our faculty, animal bioscientists are engaged in research and education in animal nutrition, animal virology, animal immunology and animal geneticists.

For more information, visit the UD Online Catalog.

Visit the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources

Under ‘Academic Program Interest,’ select Animal Biociences.

Contact our faculty to learn more.

Dr. Lesa Griffiths, TA Baker Professor of Agriculture and Natural Resources

Outbreak Investigation

The case study presents a scenario in which food has been implicated as a vehicle for an illness outbreak of microbiological origin. Students assume various roles to investigate and solve the outbreak and to evaluate approaches to prevent recurrence. The case study can be used in written format that could be completed individually or in groups as a class or homework assignment. Interactive and hands-on elements are also available such that the investigation involves manipulatives, puzzles, and game features for the same educational content as presented in the written version. Students can be assigned to groups to address one phase of the investigation and then share findings with the class; a presentation on the case study is provided to support student discourse.

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<< DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION >>

Group A Visuals

Group A Visuals for Conserve Exercise

Group B Visuals

Conserve Exercise Group B Visuals

Group C Visuals

Group C Visuals for Conserve Exercise

Group D Visuals

Group D Visuals for Conserve Exercise

Group E Visuals

Group E Visuals for Conserve Exercise

Group F Visuals

Educator Advisory Board

CONSERVE Educational Materials

For Educator Advisory Board Confidential Review

The CONSERVE Education Team is in the process of developing educational materials for the K-12 community on the topics of agricultural water availability, quality, and societal impacts. Our goals are to create ready-to-use, multifaceted educational resources that complement current curricula, align with education content standards, and respect classroom needs and constraints.

A description of the resources is provided at the Resource Description tab. The materials available for review can be accessed under the Elementary School, Middle School, and High School headings. There is some overlap for materials we believe are appropriate for all ages, whereas other resources are targeted for different age groups.

The versions you are invited to evaluate are, in some cases, partial drafts because we would like feedback before proceeding. Please review these educational resources confidentially and provide feedback on the provided online evaluation form. Please use a separate evaluation form for each resource reviewed. Feel free to view and comment on materials for all ages, but please be sure to provide comment on the content developed for the age group you currently instruct.

We greatly appreciate your time and expertise to help us make these valuable educational resources.

Thank you!

Elementary School

Middle School

In Development: Web-based Interactives – Water Sampling and Testing; Presentation – Food Safety and Water Resources; Lab Exercise; Assessment Questions

High School

In Development: Web-based Interactives – Water Sampling and Testing; Presentation – Food Safety and Water Resources; Lab Exercise; Assessment Questions

Li Ph.D., Yihang

Faculty, Yihang Li, Ph.D., research interest includes gastrointestinal (GI) health can be evaluated by nutrient transport capacity and barrier integrity, which plays a critical role in modern animal industry that is centered in optimizing feed efficiency and enhancing disease prevention. GI function can be regulated by complicate signals from luminal nutrients/microbiome, body energy/metabolic status, gut immune activity, and central/enteric nerve system. The rapid turnover rate of intestinal epithelium (5-7 days) allows GI to adjust any potential miscommunication of these signals thus adapt environmental change. Therefore how well the GI be able to respond to environmental change, and how efficient the GI adjust itself in the corresponding environment is important for maintaining its function and optimal health. Understanding the basic physiology of GI adaptation is the foundation of developing novel feeding strategy and precise nutrition requirement in cases of early development and production stress.

My research interest is to bring novel knowledge on nutritional interventions and/or physiological stress during early development, which have immediate or long-term benefits to gut health, thus ultimately reduce animal production costs, and also contribute knowledge of relevance to human gut health.

Petit Hop Field

Petit Hop Field was installed at the University of Delaware to provide educational and experiential learning opportunities for students as well as outreach and best management practice techniques to local farmers, growers and home brewing hobbyists. The field is comprised of 90 poles set up 15 feet apart that weigh up to 800 pounds — each with galvanized steel wires that hold the hop bines in place. It will take around 1,000 hours to pick the field, which is comprised of 980 plants. Varieties of hops grown on the field will include AlphaAroma and Cascade, among others. The hops field will have an assortment to meet market demands.

Close up photos of the hops in the field.The hops field will serve as a resource to show growers what it takes to start a field, which can represent a huge return on investment if set up properly. Area growers can learn integrated pest management techniques as well as learn from our successes and failures in planting. The hops will be available to local breweries and, hopefully, spawn collaborations between UD and the Delaware community. With a Department of Plant and Soil Sciences in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, research opportunities will abound for professors and students with an interest in plant pathology.

Petit Hop Field was created through the benevolent support of Reverend Barbara Hebner, retired adjunct professor of women’s studies. The field is named in memory of Rev. Hebner’s daughter, Hilary A. Petit ’86. Hilary received a B.A. in biological sciences from UD and a Master’s and Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine from Colorado State University. She was a practicing veterinarian and became fond of home brewing while living in Alaska. Rev. Hebner’s philanthropy is a loving tribute to Hilary’s passion and enables UD students the opportunity to learn the art and science of brewing that Hilary so enjoyed.

2018 Season Time Lapse Clip

Conserve

We are facilitating the adoption of transformative on‐farm solutions that enable the safe use of nontraditional irrigation water on food crops and effectively reduce the nation’s agricultural water challenges that are exacerbated by climate change. - conservewaterforfood.org

This work is funded by the United States Department of Agriculture – National Institute of Food and Agriculture grant number 2016-66800725064.

Honorifics

Check these links often to learn of opportunities and deadlines to nominate colleagues and students (and yourself!) for the various awards and fellowships/scholarships offered in the areas in which PLSC is involved. (Scroll down for opportunities external to UD.)

UD Opportunities
(CANR has centralized alumni awards here; UD has centralized awards here.)

 

  DEADLINE
FACULTY / EMPLOYEE:
CANR Excellence in Research Award
March 1/even-numbered yrs
CANR Excellence in Teaching and Advising Award March 1/odd-numbered yrs
CANR Excellence in Service Award for Research Support Staff March 1/even-numbered yrs
CANR Excellence in Service Award for Administrative Support Staff March 1/odd-numbered yrs
CANR Excellence in Extension March 1/even-numbered yrs
CANR Inclusive Excellence Award (Faculty/Staff) March 1/odd-numbered yrs
UD Faculty Excellence in Scholarly Community Engagement Award March 1
UD Excellence in Teaching Award for Faculty March 1
UD Excellence in Undergraduate Advising and Mentoring Award March 1
Francis Alison Faculty Award March 1
March 1
UDeserve It! September 15, December 15, March 15, May 15
GRADUATE STUDENT:
DENIN Environmental Fellowship
April
Donald and Joy Sparks Graduate Fellowship September 15
Excellence in Teaching Award for Graduate Students March 1
Preston C. Townsend Biotechnology Fellowship Late October
UNDERGRADUATE:
Alexander J. Taylor Outstanding Senior Award
TBD
Emalea Pusey Warner Outstanding Senior Award TBD
PLSC Senior Award TBD
UDBG Senior Award TBD
ALUMNI:
CANR Distinguished Alumni Award
November 1
CANR Distinguished Young Alumni Award November 1
Dean’s Award for Service to the College TBD
George M. Worrilow Award August 1

External Opportunities: These links are for the award and scholarship pages of societies/organizations of which PLSC personnel tend to be members.

AAAS ACS AGU APGA
APS ASA ASABE ASHS
ASLA ASM ASPB  CSSA
ESA GS GSA IUSS
NEBCSA SSSA  SWCS WSSA
Don’t forget to learn what awards your alma mater has to offer!
Let the PLSC Honorifics Committee help nominate you!
2019 Committee: Erik Ervin (eervin at udel.edu); Bob Lyons (rlyons at udel.edu); Tracy McMullen (tracymc at udel.edu); Maria Pautler (mpautler at udel.edu); Tara Trammell (ttram at udel.edu); and Rodrigo Vargas (rvargas at udel.edu).

 

Nomination Forms

CANR Inclusive Excellence Award (Faculty/Staff)

The CANR Inclusive Excellence Award is awarded to a staff or faculty member biennially in odd-numbered years. The award recognizes individuals whose work embodies UD’s Inclusive Excellence initiative to advance inclusive excellence within the institution or community. The evaluation criteria (below) serve as a guideline for developing the nomination and nominee’s statement.

The award is based on the principle of inclusion as defined by the American Association of Colleges and Universities (AAC&U), rewarding those who have shown excellence in:

“The active, intentional, and ongoing engagement with diversity—in the curriculum, in the co-curriculum, and in communities…”

Awardees will be recognized at the CANR Convocation Ceremony in May and receive a monetary gift of $2000, an award certificate and a brick engraved with their name to be placed in the Dunham Garden.

  • Deadline: the graduate student’s major advisor may submit nominations online by March 1

Deadline for Submissions: March 1

Nomination form

Rules of Eligibility for the Award

  • Employee nominees must be a full-time CANR staff or faculty member.
  • Former recipients of the CANR Inclusive Excellence Award are ineligible.
  • Nominations must be voluntary.

Process

  • Nominations open December 1 of even-numbered years and close March 1 of odd-numbered years.
  • Nominations are submitted online and should address the definition and core principles of inclusive excellence as applicable to the individual nominee (link here).
  • Nominees are notified shortly after March 1 and asked to submit a two-page impact statement that addresses their contributions toward inclusive excellence. Evidentiary materials may be appended to the statement.
  • The selection committee is appointed by the dean. The committee submits a ranked list of potential awardees (with rationale) to the dean for a final decision.
  • The award winner is notified by May 1 and is recognized at the CANR Convocation Ceremony in odd-numbered years.

Evaluation Criteria

The following four criteria are based on the principles of inclusive excellence identified in the University’s Diversity Action Plan, Inclusive Excellence: A plan for diversity at UD. By virtue of one’s position and responsibilities, contributions to each of UD’s principles of inclusive excellence will vary among nominees for this award. The selection committee evaluates the overall commitment to inclusive excellence and impact on diversity in one or more of the following categories:

  • Engagement in efforts to recruit and retain diverse staff, faculty, students and/or community partners to CANR
  • Contributions to curricular and/or co-curricular activities that affirm our educational mission to develop an inclusive and diverse student body
  • Engagement with professional development and educational opportunities that leverage diversity as a core competency
  • Contributions to efforts to improve campus climate within UD and/or strengthen community engagement to advance inclusivity and diversity

CANR FACULTY AWARDS

CANR Excellence in Teaching and Advising Award

  • $3,000 awarded biennially in odd-numbered years (i.e. 2019, 2021, 2023, etc.)
  • For eminence in teaching, mentoring and advising
  • Deadline: Students, faculty and staff submit nominations online by March 1 of odd-numbered years

CANR Excellence in Teaching and Advising

Deadline for Submissions: March 1 of odd-numbered years

Nomination form

The CANR Excellence in Teaching and Advising Award is awarded biennially in odd-numbered years.  The award recognizes CANR faculty involved in teaching, mentoring and advising students.  Individuals may be nominated for teaching, advising, or both teaching and advising.

Nature of the Award

  • One award presented biennially in odd-numbered years (i.e. 2019, 2021, etc.).
  • For eminence in teaching, mentoring and advising.
  • Individuals may be nominated for teaching, advising, or both teaching and advising.
  • The awardee is recognized at the CANR Convocation Ceremony in May and receives:
    • $3,000
    • an award certificate
    • a brick engraved with their name to be placed in the Dunham Garden

Deadline: Students, faculty and staff submit nominations online by March 1 of odd-numbered years.

Rules of Eligibility for the Award

  • Nominee must be a full-time CANR faculty member.
  • The nominee may teach either undergraduate or graduate students, or both.
  • Former recipients of the award are ineligible.

Process

  • Nominations open December 1 of even-numbered years and close March 1 of odd-numbered years.
  • Nominations are submitted online and should address the Criteria of Excellence.
  • Nominees are notified electronically and must submit a current CV within 7 days of notification.
  • The selection committee is appointed by the dean. The committee evaluates the nomination package (unsolicited nomination letters and the CV) against the rubric.
  • The award winner is notified electronically by May 1 and is recognized at the CANR Convocation Ceremony in odd-numbered years.
  • Applicants will be evaluated on criteria based on the UD Excellence in Teaching Award.

Criteria of Excellence

1.     Intellectually demanding and rigorous (10 points max)

  • is thought-provoking and intellectually demanding
  • relates course material to other fields, contemporary issues, student experiences

2.     Deeply committed to teaching and students (10 points max)

  • is enthusiastic about teaching
  • is conscientious, organized, and well-prepared for class
  • is concerned about individual students and their development
  • is readily available to students
  • has participated in or led professional growth opportunities
  • has served as a teaching mentor to other faculty and graduate students
  • has served on committees or working groups related to teaching and learning

3.     Communication with students and relaying of course content (10 points max)

  • provides clear expectations, relevant assignments, and ample feedback
  • presents material clearly, asks good questions, and adjusts strategies as necessary to facilitate understanding
  • engages students and stimulates participation
  • is open-minded, fair, and respectful of differences among students

4.     Has positive and lasting impact on students (10 points max)

  • inspires students to excel
  • promotes critical reading, thinking, and writing
  • produces more learning than in other courses
  • affects students’ educational and career goals and achievements5.     Engaged in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (10 points max)
  • Through the writing of grants, peer-reviewed materials or textbooks, scholarly presentations, curriculum development and other creative activity related to teaching and learning

CANR Excellence in Research Award

  • $3,000 awarded biennially in even-numbered years (i.e. 2018, 2020, 2022, etc.)
  • For eminence in research quality, scientific leadership and mentoring, and service to science
  • Deadline: Students, faculty and staff submit nominations online by March 1 of even-numbered years

Deadline for Submissions: March 1 of even-numbered years

Nomination form

Evaluation Criteria and Rubric

Purpose of the Award

The CANR Excellence in Research Award is awarded biennially in even-numbered years (i.e. 2018, 2020, etc.) The award recognizes individuals that are involved in research that involves the mentoring of graduate students, post-docs, undergraduates, and/or junior faculty. The Evaluation Criteria serve as a guideline for developing the nomination and will be weighted equally in the selection process.

Nature of the Award

  • One award presented biennially in even-numbered years (i.e. 2018, 2020, 2022, etc.).
  • For eminence in research quality, scientific leadership and mentorship, and service to science.
  • The awardee is recognized at the CANR Convocation Ceremony in May and receives:
    • $3,000
    • an award certificate
    • a brick engraved with their name to be placed in the Dunham Garden
  • Deadline: Students, faculty and staff submit nominations online by March 1 of even-numbered years.

Rules of Eligibility for the Award

  • Nominee must be a full-time CANR faculty member.
  • The nominee may mentor graduate students, post-docs, undergraduates, and/or junior faculty.
  • Former recipients of the CANR Excellence in Research Award are ineligible.
  • Nominations must be voluntary.

Process

  • Nominations open December 1 of odd-numbered years and close March 1 of even-numbered years.
  • Nominations are submitted online and should address the Evaluation Criteria.
  • Nominees are notified electronically and must submit a current CV within 7 days of notification.
  • The selection committee is appointed by the dean. The committee evaluates the nomination package (unsolicited nomination letters and the CV) against the Evaluation Criteria/rubric.
  • The award winner is notified electronically by May 1 and is recognized at the CANR Convocation Ceremony in even-numbered years.

 

CANR STAFF AWARDS

CANR Excellence in Service Award (for Administrative Support Staff)

  • $2,000 presented biennially to in odd-numbered years (i.e. 2019, 2021, 2023, etc.)Recognizes superior work ethic, noteworthy performance, outstanding and meritorious service, and positive impact on the goals of the department and CANR.
  • Deadline: Faculty and staff submit nominations online by March 1 of odd-numbered years.

Deadline for Submissions: March 1 of odd-numbered years

Nomination form

The Excellence in Service Award originated in 2015 to recognize staff in administrative and research support roles. Recipients receive a monetary award of $2,000 presented each year at the College’s Convocation in May. A staff member in an administrative support role is recognized in odd-numbered years, and a staff member in a research support role is recognized in even-numbered years.

Nature of the Award

  • One award presented biennially to Administrative Support Staff in odd-numbered years  (i.e. 2019, 2021, etc.).
  • Recognizes individuals for superior work ethic, noteworthy performance, outstanding and meritorious service, and positive impact on the overall goals and objectives of their department and CANR.
  • The awardee is recognized at the CANR Convocation Ceremony in May and receives:
    • $2,000
    • an award certificate
    • a brick engraved with their name to be placed in the Dunham Garden
  • Deadline: Faculty and staff submit nominations online by March 1 of odd-numbered years.

Rules of Eligibility for the Award

  • Nominee must be a full-time CANR staff member and have completed a minimum of three years employment in the college prior to the end of the March 1 deadline.
  • Former recipients of the CANR Excellence in Service Award are ineligible.
  • Nominations must be voluntary.
  • Nominations must include the supervisor’s endorsement.

Process  

  • All faculty and staff may submit nominations.
  • Include examples of nominee’s:
    • a. Superior work ethic;
    • b. Noteworthy performance;
    • c. Outstanding and meritorious service;
    • d. Positive impact(s) on the overall goals and objectives of the department and college.
  • The committee will accept a maximum of (5) letters of support**
  • Nominations may include input from several sources**
  • Submit only one nomination per nominee.
  • A selection committee appointed by the dean will review all nominations and notify the winner by May 1.
  • The selection committee must obtain the endorsement of the nominee’s supervisor.

CANR Excellence in Extension (for Cooperative Extension Professionals)

  • $2,000 awarded biennially in even-numbered years (i.e. 2018, 2020, 2022, etc.)
  • For excellence in Extension educational programming
  • Preliminary​ ​Nominations​ ​are​ ​due​ ​by​ ​December​ ​30 (odd-numbered years)

Deadline for Submissions: Preliminary​ ​Nominations​ ​are​ ​due​ ​by​ ​December​ ​30 (odd-numbered years)

Characteristics​ ​of​ ​Excellence​ ​in​ ​Extension

The​ ​CANR​ ​Excellence​ ​in​ ​Extension​ ​Award​ ​is​ ​based​ ​on​ ​the​ ​ECOP​ ​National​ ​Excellence​ ​in​ ​Extension Award.​ ​The​ ​CANR​ ​Excellence​ ​in​ ​Extension​ ​Award​ ​is​ ​presented​ ​in​ ​even​ ​years​ ​to​ ​an​ ​individual​ ​who has​ ​strived​ ​throughout​ ​his/her​ ​career​ ​to​ ​achieve​ ​the​ ​benchmarks​ ​reflective​ ​of​ ​excellence​ ​in Extension​ ​educational​ ​programming.​ ​​ ​These​ ​include,​ ​but​ ​are​ ​not​ ​limited​ ​to,​ ​demonstration​ ​of high​ ​impact​ ​of​ ​programs;​ ​visionary​ ​leadership​ ​and​ ​anticipation​ ​of​ ​emerging​ ​issues​ ​for​ ​clientele and​ ​the​ ​system;​ ​commitment​ ​to​ ​diversity;​ ​and​ ​integration​ ​of​ ​programs​ ​in​ ​partnerships​ ​with university​ ​colleagues​ ​and​ ​outside​ ​clientele.​ ​​ ​A​ ​successful​ ​award​ ​recipient​ ​should​ ​be​ ​recognized as​ ​a​ ​leader​ ​in​ ​the​ ​university​ ​and​ ​in​ ​the​ ​respective​ ​field​ ​of​ ​expertise.​ ​​ ​Awardees​ ​should demonstrate​ ​the​ ​ability​ ​to​ ​garner​ ​a​ ​continual​ ​flow​ ​of​ ​resources​ ​for​ ​sustainable​ ​Extension programs,​ ​use​ ​innovative​ ​teaching​ ​methods​ ​and​ ​be​ ​recognized​ ​by​ ​peers​ ​and​ ​the​ ​communities served.

Eligibility

The​ ​nominee​ ​must​ ​be​ ​an​ ​active​ ​Cooperative​ ​Extension​ ​System​ ​professional​ ​(state,​ ​and/or county)​ ​with​ ​at​ ​least​ ​50​ ​percent​ ​FTE​ ​university​ ​appointment​ ​in​ ​Extension​ ​(Administrative​ ​FTE >50%​ ​​ ​disqualify​ ​a​ ​nominee)​ ​The​ ​nominee​ ​demonstrates​ ​responsibility​ ​for​ ​Extension programming​ ​for​ ​ten​ ​concurrent​ ​years.​ ​​ ​Nominations​ ​may​ ​be​ ​submitted​ ​by​ ​a​ ​nominee, supervisor,​ ​or​ ​peer.​ ​Past​ ​recipients​ ​of​ ​the​ ​CANR​ ​Excellence​ ​in​ ​Extension​ ​Award​ ​are​ ​ineligible​ ​for this​ ​award.

Nomination​ ​Process

1.​ ​​ ​Letter​ ​of​ ​nominations​ ​may​ ​be​ ​submitted​ ​by​ ​a​ ​nominee,​ ​supervisor,​ ​or​ ​peer.​ ​​ ​This​ ​nomination is​ ​a​ ​brief​ ​paragraph​ ​stating​ ​noteworthy​ ​performance​ ​of​ ​nominee​ ​and​ ​is​ ​submitted​ ​to​ ​identified member​ ​of​ ​Extension​ ​Leadership​ ​Team.

2.​ ​​ ​The​ ​Extension​ ​Leadership​ ​Team​ ​will​ ​select​ ​the​ ​nominees​ ​for​ ​full​ ​application.

3.​ ​​ ​Full​ ​application​ ​includes​ ​examples​ ​of​ ​nominee’s​ ​superior​ ​work​ ​ethic,​ ​noteworthy performance,​ ​outstanding​ ​and​ ​meritorious​ ​service,​ ​positive​ ​impacts​ ​on​ ​the​ ​overall​ ​goals​ ​and objectives​ ​of​ ​the​ ​department​ ​and​ ​college.​ ​​ ​Nominations​ ​could​ ​include​ ​input​ ​from​ ​several sources​ ​and​ ​all​ ​nominees​ ​must​ ​have​ ​a​ ​minimum​ ​of​ ​10​ ​concurrent​ ​years​ ​of​ ​Extension programming​ ​and​ ​employment​ ​in​ ​the​ ​college​ ​prior​ ​to​ ​the​ ​end​ ​of​ ​the​ ​application​ ​deadline.

4.​ ​​ ​A​ ​selection​ ​committee​ ​made​ ​up​ ​of​ ​Friends​ ​of​ ​Extension​ ​and​ ​retirees​ ​will​ ​be​ ​appointed​ ​by​ ​the Extension​ ​Director​ ​and​ ​will​ ​review​ ​full​ ​applications,​ ​and​ ​makes​ ​the​ ​selection.

Selection​ ​Criteria

1.​ ​Demonstrated​ ​high​ ​impact​ ​of​ ​programs;​ ​anticipated​ ​and​ ​responded​ ​to​ ​critical​ ​public​ ​needs with​ ​solutions​ ​on​ ​critical​ ​issues.​ ​​ ​Enhanced​ ​the​ ​public​ ​good​ ​indicated​ ​by​ ​economic,​ ​social​ ​and/or environmental​ ​impact.​ ​35%

2.​ ​​ ​Recognized​ ​excellence​ ​in​ ​one’s​ ​field​ ​of​ ​expertise​ ​as​ ​demonstrated​ ​by​ ​sustained​ ​external funding,​ ​awards,​ ​recognition,​ ​and​ ​request​ ​for​ ​regional/state/national​ ​addresses​ ​and​ ​speaking engagements,;​ ​and​ ​appropriate,​ ​peer​ ​reviewed​ ​publication​ ​of​ ​scholarly​ ​work,​ ​including​ ​journal articles.​ ​​ ​20%

3.​ ​Demonstrated​ ​innovation​ ​in​ ​partnerships,​ ​funding​ ​and​ ​educational​ ​program​ ​delivery.​ ​​ ​20%

4.​ ​Ability​ ​to​ ​engage​ ​university​ ​colleagues​ ​in​ ​Extension​ ​programming​ ​with​ ​evidence​ ​of leadership,​ ​teamwork,​ ​and​ ​mentoring​ ​both​ ​within​ ​and​ ​outside​ ​Extension​ ​15%

5.​ ​Demonstrated​ ​conveyance​ ​of​ ​cultural​ ​competencies​ ​and​ ​appreciation​ ​for​ ​diversity.​ ​​ ​10%

 

Timeline

December​ ​of​ ​odd​ ​year​ ​award​ ​announced

Selection​ ​Committee​ ​appointed​ ​by​ ​the​ ​Director​ ​of​ ​Extension​ ​by​ ​January​ ​1

Preliminary​ ​Nominations​ ​are​ ​due​ ​by​ ​December​ ​30

Extension​ ​Leadership​ ​Team​ ​selects​ ​finalists​ ​for​ ​full​ ​application​ ​by​ ​January​ ​15

Full​ ​applications​ ​are​ ​due​ ​by​ ​February​ ​15

Selection​ ​committee​ ​will​ ​make​ ​their​ ​decision​ ​and​ ​notify​ ​the​ ​winners​ ​by​ ​March​ ​31

Awards​ ​presented​ ​at​ ​College​ ​Convocation​ ​in​ ​May

CANR Excellence in Service Award (for Research Support Staff)

  • $2,000 presented biennially in even-numbered years (i.e. 2018, 2020, 2022, etc.)
  • Recognizes superior work ethic, noteworthy performance, outstanding and meritorious service, and positive impact on the goals of the department and CANR.
  • Deadline: Faculty and staff submit nominations online by March 1 of even-numbered years

Deadline for Submissions: March 1 of even-numbered years

Nomination form

The Excellence in Service Award originated in 2015 to recognize staff in administrative and research support roles. Recipients receive a monetary award of $2,000 presented each year at the College’s Convocation in May. A staff member in an administrative support role is recognized in odd-numbered years, and a staff member in a research support role is recognized in even-numbered years.

Nature of the Award

  • One award presented biennially to Research Support Staff in even-numbered years  (i.e. 2018, 2020, 2022, etc.).
  • Recognizes individuals for superior work ethic, noteworthy performance, outstanding and meritorious service, and positive impact on the overall goals and objectives of their department and CANR.
  • The awardee is recognized at the CANR Convocation Ceremony in May and receives:
    • $2,000
    • an award certificate
    • a brick engraved with their name to be placed in the Dunham Garden
  • Deadline: Faculty and staff submit nominations online by March 1 of even-numbered years.

Rules of Eligibility for the Award

  • Nominee must be a full-time CANR staff member and have completed a minimum of three years employment in the college prior to the end of the March 1 deadline.
  • Former recipients of the CANR Excellence in Service Award are ineligible.
  • Nominations must be voluntary.
  • Nominations must include the supervisor’s endorsement.

Process  

  • CANR faculty and staff may submit nominations.
  • Include examples of nominee’s:
    • a. Superior work ethic;
    • b. Noteworthy performance;
    • c. Outstanding and meritorious service;
    • d. Positive impact(s) on the overall goals and objectives of the department and college.
  • The committee will accept a maximum of (5) letters of support.
  • Nominations may include input from several sources.
  • Submit only one nomination per nominee.
  • A selection committee appointed by the dean will review all nominations and notify the winner by May 1.

The selection committee must obtain the endorsement of the nominee’s supervisor.

CANR GRADUATE STUDENT AWARDS

CANR William J Benton Graduate Student Award

  • Two annual awards, $500 each, presented to two graduate students (one PhD and one MS)
  • For excellence in research and outstanding accomplishments and service to their profession
  • Deadline: the graduate student’s major advisor may submit nominations online by March 16

Deadline for Submissions: March 16

Nomination form

The William J. Benton Graduate Student Award was established in honor of Dr. William J. Benton, in recognition of his dedication to graduate education. Dr. Benton served the University as CANR Associate Dean of Research, Associate Director of the University of Delaware Agricultural Experiment Station, and Professor in the Department of Animal and Food Sciences. In these diverse roles, Dr. Benton’s commitment to graduate education and support of excellence in graduate student research were widely recognized and greatly appreciated by CANR faculty and graduate students.

The award is presented annually to two graduate students (one Ph.D. and one M.S.) who have achieved Dr. Benton’s high standards of graduate education. College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (CANR) graduate students who have excelled in research and have an outstanding record of academic accomplishments and service to their profession are eligible for nomination. Award selection is based on student accomplishments during their current degree program, and does not include separate accomplishments in the field completed as employees or research professionals.

Nature of the Award

  • Two awards presented annually to one MS student and one PhD student.
  • Awardees are recognized at the CANR Convocation Ceremony in May and receive a plaque and $500.
  • Deadline: submit nominations online by March 16.

Rules of Eligibility & Process

  • Nominees must have a minimum GPA of 3.5 and be in the final year of their graduate degree program
  • Eligible candidates cannot have already graduated from the University of Delaware
  • Complete the nomination form online and submit with all required materials:
    • Nomination letter from the Graduate Student’s Major Advisor which clearly indicates accomplishments associated with the student’s current degree program;
    • Graduate Student’s curriculum vitae;
    • Graduate Student’s unofficial UD transcript and the transcripts from the previous institutions where they were enrolled in a graduate program.
  • The award recipients will be selected by the CANR Research Advisory Committee
  • Awards will be presented by the Dean and Department Chair of the recipient at an event in May

Sustainability at CANR

The University of Delaware’s College of Agriculture & Natural Resources recognizes the importance of sustainability as an outcome in education campus-wide. CANR majors which teach and encourage sustainability include:
  • Animal Science – exploring ways to produce food given the complex relationship between the health of domestic animals, humans and our shared environment.
  • Environmental and Resource Economics  (optional concentration in sustainable development) –  focuses on allocating resources for the benefit of present and future generations and the international dimensions of such challenges across countries and cultures. 
  • Food Science – exploring ways to grow, process, package, preserve and utilize food in ways that make the food safe, nutritious, affordable and available with a minimal environmental impact and waste generation.
  • Insect Ecology and Conservation – study of the most abundant creatures on Earth—insects—and their interactions with other wildlife, humans, and the environment.
  • Landscape Architecture – combines science, technology, art and creative problem solving with a love of nature and the world outdoors. This professional program emphasizes design of outdoor spaces that are safe, aesthetically pleasing, and environmentally sustainable.
  • Landscape Horticulture and Design –  fuses the creative aspects of art and design with the technical and scientific aspects of horticulture. The discipline involves the analysis, planning, design, implementation and management of sustainable natural and constructed environments.
  • Natural Resource Management – an interdisciplinary approach to manage and sustain natural and environmental resources globally.
  • Plant Science –  applies the principles of agriculture, biology and chemistry to plant life in horticultural, agricultural, and natural settings with an emphasis on maintaining a safe, aesthetically pleasing, and sustainable environment.
  • Wildlife Ecology and Conservation – examines all non-domesticated animals and the challenges they face sharing the planet with humans.

Contract Courses

Description of Contract Courses

ANFS 464, ANFS X66, ANFS 468

 

ANFS 464 is a course for students who which to receive credit for a supervised, faculty-monitored, career-related experience in one or more aspects of the animal science or food science industries on or off campus. For example students that want experience working on our University farm facilities or on private farms register for ANFS 464 . Students may  obtain a maximum of 3 credits per internship which requires 120 hours of internship work.  A student may register for an internship during any semester. ANFS 464 meets the DLE requirement for graduation. ANFS 464 is a pass/fail course.

ANFS X66 is a course for students who receive credit for independent, faculty-monitored activities in the fields of animal science or food science. Students may obtain a maximum  of 3 credits per semester which requires 120 hours of work. A student may register for  independent study during any semester. These activities can include library research  projects or more informal, small research projects which are designed specifically for  students (which means they are probably not part of larger, substantial or funded project;  or the number of animals and/or data collected are not substantial enough for real  statistical analysis; there is no statistical experimental design; focus on data and lab techniques is usually not as strong as in ANFS 468.) ANFS X66 may also be used to teach a  course under special circumstances for example to a student that cannot take the course during a regular offering because of a scheduling conflict. ANFS X66 does not meet the DLE requirement for graduation No more than 5 credits of X66 may be counted towards the major. ANFS X66 is a letter-graded course.

ANFS 468 is a course for students who want to receive credit for a supervised, faculty-monitored, experience in research in the fields of animal science or food science. Students may obtain a maximum of 3 credits per semester which requires 120 hours of research (40h for 1 credit). A maximum of 3 credits in ANSC 468 may count towards the major. A student may register for research during any semester. While these students are typically part of a larger research program, beginning students usually do not have their own projects and will assist in on -going research projects while learning techniques. Advanced students may be assigned to specific research projects, which may be their own. ANFS 468 meets the DLE requirement for graduation. ANFS 468 is a letter -graded course.

There are contract forms for each of these courses which must be reviewed and signed by the Department Chair or his/her designee.

Diversity

Mission Statement: The College of Agriculture and Natural Resources is committed to promoting an inclusive and supportive environment for all faculty, staff, and students. The CANR Diversity Committee is actively developing activities, training, and programming aligned with UD’s Diversity Action Plan.

Feedback: The College of Agriculture and Natural Resources welcomes your comments, questions, and feedback via the link below. feedbackbutton

 

 

Related Resources

Graduate School – Application

 

Most programs will not review your application until all parts of it are submitted. So, start preparing the application components early and send them in as soon as possible

A complete graduate school application usually consists of:

  • Application Form
  • Application Fee
  • Official Transcripts from all institutions attended
    To request your official transcript, contact the Office of the Registrar. For transcripts from other institutions, contact their Registrars.
  • Test Scores
  • Statement
  • Letters of Recommendation 

Graduate and professional schools often require some sort of written statement — often called a “statement of purpose,” “personal statement,” or “letter of intent”– as a part of the application. Some statements require rather specific information–for example, the applicant’s intended area of study within a graduate field. Still others are quite unstructured, leaving the applicant free to address a wide range of matters. The importance of the statement varies from school to school and from field to field.

Determine your purpose in writing the statement 

Usually the purpose is to persuade the admissions committee that you are an applicant who should be chosen. Whatever its purpose, the content must be presented in a manner that will give coherence to the whole statement.

Pay attention to the purpose throughout the statement so that extraneous material is left out.

Pay attention to the audience (committee) throughout the statement. Remember that your audience is made up of professionals in their field, and you are not going to tell them how they should act or what they should be. You are the amateur.

Determine the content of your statement

Be sure to answer any questions fully. Analyze the questions or guidance statements for the essay completely and answer all parts. Usually graduate and professional schools are interested in the following matters, although the form of the question(s) and the responses may vary:

  • Your purpose in graduate study. Think this through before you try to answer the question.
  • The area of study in which you wish to specialize. Learn about the discipline in animal and /or food science in detail so that you are able to state your preferences using the language of the field. It would be helpful to read some of the journal articles of faculty members under which you would like to study at the institutions you have selected.
  • Your intended future use of your graduate study. Include your career goals and plans for the future.
  • Your unique preparation and fitness for study in the field. Correlate your academic background with your extracurricular experience to show how they unite to make you a special candidate.
  • Any problems or inconsistencies in your records or scores, such as a bad semester. Explain in a positive manner. Since this is a rebuttal argument, it should be followed by a positive statement of your abilities. In some instances, it may be more appropriate to discuss this outside of the personal statement.
  • Any special conditions that are not revealed elsewhere in the application, such as a significant (35 hour per week) workload outside of school. This, too, should be followed with a positive statement about yourself and your future.
  • You may be asked, “Why do you wish to attend this school?” Research the school and describe its special appeal to you.
  • Above all, this statement should contain information about you as a person. They know nothing about you unless you tell them. You are the subject of the statement.

Determine your approach and style of the statement (click to open)

There is no such thing as “the perfect way to write a statement.” There is only the one that best fits you.

DO

  • Be objective, yet self-revelatory. Write directly and in a straightforward manner that tells about your experience and what it means to you. Do not use “academese.”
  • Form conclusions that explain the value and meaning of your experience, such as what you learned about yourself and your field and your future goals. Draw your conclusions from the evidence your life provides.
  • Be specific. Document your conclusions with specific instances. See below a list of general words and phrases to avoid using without explanation.
  • Get to the point early on and catch the attention of the reader.
  • Limit its length to two pages or less. In some instances it may be longer, depending on the school’s instructions.

DON’T

  • Use the “what I did with my life” approach.
  • Use the “I’ve always wanted to be a _____” approach.
  • Use a catalog of achievements. This is only a list of what you have done, and tells nothing about you as a person.
  • Lecture the reader. For example, you should not write a statement such as “Communication skills are important in this field.” Any graduate admissions committee member knows that.
  •  Words and phrases to avoid without explanation
significant
interesting
challenging
satisfying/satisfaction
appreciate
invaluable
exciting/excited
enjoyable/enjoy
feel good
appealing to me
appealing aspect
I like it
it’s important
I can contribute
meant a lot to me
stimulating
incredible
gratifying
fascinating
meaningful
helping people
I like helping people
remarkable
rewarding
useful
valuable
helpful

How important are letters of recommendation?

  • Letters of recommendation are required for almost every graduate school application and are a very important part of the application process. Usually grades and test scores factor in most heavily; however, your letters of recommendation could be the deciding factor in the admission process.

How many letters of recommendation do I need?

Although it can vary, generally, you will be asked for three letters. We recommend that you send only the number of letters requested. Admissions committees do not have enough time to read extra credential

Whom should I ask for letters of recommendation?

  • The best letter writers are those that know you well and can provide an evaluation of your ability to perform and succeed at the graduate level.

Graduate and professional school admissions people tell us the following make the best letter writers:

  • Someone who knows you well
  • Someone with the title of “Professor”
  • Someone who is a professor at the school granting your baccalaureate degree
  • Someone who has earned the degree which you are seeking in your graduate work
  • Someone with an advanced degree who has supervised you in a job or internship aligned with the graduate program you are pursuing (e.g., Public Health, Social Work, Business Administration, etc.)
  • Someone who has academically evaluated you in an upper-division class
  • Note: Letters from family friends, political figures, and the like are discouraged and, in fact, may be detrimental.

How do I approach potential letter writers?

  • First, make a list of professors and/or supervisors who will be your best advocates. Then, set up an appointment to discuss your request in person. Do not make the request via email. Be prepared to articulate your interest and reasons for attending graduate school.
  • Letters of recommendation are written strictly on a voluntary basis. The best approach is to ask potential letter writers if they are willing to write you a strong letter. If you sense reluctance or the answer is no, ask someone else.

When should I approach letter writers?

  • Professors and supervisors are generally pleased to write on your behalf; however, they are usually involved in many activities. Faculty are especially busy during the months of May and September. Be considerate of your letter writers’ time and approach them at least two months before you need the letter.

How can I go about getting good letters of recommendation?

  • Since your best letters will come from those who know you well, make an effort to get to know your professors and/or supervisors. A few ways you can do this are to speak up in class, select courses with small class sizes, take more than one class from a professor, do research for a professor, take on optional projects, and regularly attend office hours.
  • The best strategy you can use to get a good letter of recommendation, particularly if a professor hasn’t known you long, is to provide your letter writer with ample information about you. This way, you will get a letter that includes concrete details about you, instead of a letter that contains only your grade, which is of limited value.

What information do my letter writers need to write good letters?

You can help your letter writers write enlightening letters by giving each of them a portfolio comprised of:

  1. A cover note (ok to send via email after your recommender has agreed to write a letter for you) that includes:
  • Information on how to get in touch with you in case they need to reach you
  • What you would like emphasized in each letter
  • A list of schools to which you are applying, and due dates, with the earliest due date at the top
  • Any other information that is relevant
  • Open and close your note with thanks and acknowledgement that the letter writer’s time is valuable and that this letter is important to your professional future.
  1. Your UD student ID (in case the recommender wants to view your transcript)
  2. A draft of your statement of purpose
  3. Your resume
  4. Recommendation forms are almost all electronic but you will have to provide the program with the Recommender’s name, title, contact info (telephone, fax, address etc)

Do graduate schools care if letters are confidential or not?

  • In general, graduate programs prefer confidential letters. Admissions officials say that it displays more confidence on the part of the applicant if letters are “confidential” (meaning you, the applicant cannot see the letter).

 

Graduate School – Financial Aid

  • Assistantships are usually campus-affiliated work assignments (e.g. graduate teaching instructor, research associate) that provide an individual a stipend (salary) and often waive tuition. Assistantship availability is discipline-specific, and most graduate students in the animal or food sciences are provided with assistantships.
  • Assistantships are often associated with a specific professor – that’s why it is important to identify potential research mentors before sending an application to the graduate program. Even if you meet admission requirements, admission will only be granted if a research mentor agrees to accept you into their lab and fund your assistantship.
  • The graduate school office will send all the applications for a department to the faculty in the department.
    • If you’ve already been corresponding with someone, they’ll see your application and say –“Oh – I know them and we’ve been chatting over email. I want him/her in my lab!”
  • Fellowships are typically granted to individuals to cover their stipend and tuition while they conduct their graduate work. Awards may be single or multiple-year and may come from a university or outside organization. Awards are highly competitive and based on an individual’s merit as measured by grades, GRE scores, publications, and letters of recommendation. If you are a strong student, fellowships are an excellent way to get you in virtually any lab of your choice.
  • Grants are most often awarded to cover expenses associated with carrying out research or other specific projects, such as travel, materials, or computers.
Researchers at UD look at stink bugs on sweet corn

How Do I Choose a School?

 

This next step is to research programs that match your interests and fit your needs. Don’t limit yourself at this point, but instead gather information on a broad range of programs. Click on any of the following steps to get advice on how to proceed.

  • Identify a broad discipline that you are interested in studying. For example, in the animal science field, this might be poultry nutrition, avian immunology, cattle reproduction, or equine genomics.
  • Find the UD faculty member(s) most closely related to that discipline and ask them where are the best programs or faculty in the discipline in which you want to study
  • Go to a research journal in the discipline in which you want to study and look for recent research papers you find interesting and see who the authors are.
    • For example – you could go to the Journal of Animal Science and look up “Ruminant Nutrition” and see who the professors studying ruminant nutrition are.
    • The address (college) of the corresponding authors is usually at the bottom of the first page. Corresponding authors are those people who directed the research and thus sponsored the graduate students.
    • Follow up by visiting the potential research mentor’s webpage to learn more about his/her research program.
  • Once you have some names of potential research mentors, look up some of their research papers published in journals and visit their website to get an understanding of the full scope of research they do in their laboratories
  • You can also consult sites such as these for researching graduate and professional schools. These are particularly useful if considering a graduate program outside of the animal or food sciences:
    • Peterson’s Graduate Schools
    • US News, Best Graduate Schools

  • Reputation of the Faculty – What are their academic degrees/credentials and research specialties? How many research articles have they published within the past few years? Look at faculty websites if available.
  • Quality of the Program – This is measured by many different factors, many of which are mentioned below. You may choose to look at graduate school rankings to help you assess a program’s quality.
  • Financial Costs – What are the opportunities for fellowships, assistantships, or scholarships? What other sources of financial aid are available?
  • Admission Requirements – GPA test scores, undergraduate coursework, undergraduate GPA, specific entrance examinations, etc.
  • Facilities – Consider the quality of on-site research facilities.
  • Geographic Location – Will studying in a particular location help you meet personal or professional goals?

Junior Year
  • Identify a discipline you would like to study
  • Begin researching available programs
  • Request promotional materials
  • Visit schools’ websites
  • Talk to faculty/alumni/current students in the program
  • Start exploring financial aid resources
  • Sign up for required standardized test and take a practice test
  • Identify potential letter writers
  • Take the required standardized test
Senior Year

Summer and Fall Semester

  • Email potential research mentors to enquire whether they will be accepting new students
  • Write the first draft of your statement of purpose
  • Request your letters of recommendation from faculty
  • Order official transcripts
  • Write final draft of statement of purpose
  • Complete and mail your applications
  • Apply for aid available through program; assistantships, fellowships, scholarships, etc.

Spring Semester

  • Complete and submit financial aid applications
  • Visit prospective campuses if possible, and talk to faculty/students to help you make your final decision
  • Follow-up with schools to make sure your file is complete
  • After receiving acceptance from the school of your choice, send in the required deposit, and contact other schools and decline acceptances
  • Write thank you notes to people who helped you

 

 

 

Why Graduate School?

  • Graduate school constitutes an advanced program of study focused on a particular academic discipline
  • In the animal or food sciences, graduate degrees are required for some higher level technical positions in industry, government, and academia
  • Graduate students conduct original research in a specific discipline (for example animal nutrition, animal reproductive physiology, growth physiology, immunology, virology, genetics, genomics, food microbiology, flavor chemistry, functional properties of foods)
  • Compared to undergraduate studies, graduate students in the animal or food sciences take one to two discipline-specific courses each semester and expectations regarding the quality and quantity of academic work are greater
  • Graduate degrees are available in almost any subject and should be selected based on your career objectives
  • Master’s degrees are usually completed by full-time students in 2 years. Following completion of a Master’s Degree, students can seek employment, apply to professional schools, or continue to a Doctoral Degree Program.
  • Doctoral degrees are the highest degrees possible. They usually require the creation of new knowledge via independent research on a focused issue. Doctoral degrees typically take 3-4 years to complete if a student already has a Master’s Degree or 5-7 years to complete without a Master’s Degree. Doctoral Degree recipients are eligible for highly-skilled jobs related to their field of study.

 

 

Borel Global Fellows

Aim and Scope: The College of Agriculture and Natural Resources at the University of
Delaware has partnered with AGRA (Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa) to build a
Master’s degree program to train African students in plant breeding, crop protection, soil
science, agricultural economics, microbiology, wildlife management, and entomology and other areas vital to food security in Africa. Made possible by a generous gift from Jim and Marcia Borel, the program provides opportunities for one to two students per year to complete an MS degree at the University of Delaware while conducting research in their home country in an area of critical need.

Current Focus: In response to identified needs in Africa, the 2018 focal areas are 1) plant
breeding and genetics, 2) agricultural economics, 3) soil science, 4) microbiology, 5) wildlife ecology, and 6) entomology. Of particular interest are projects that will lead to improvements in smallholder farm productivity.

Program: Students will be recommended to start at the University of Delaware during the
summer to acclimate and begin involvement in research coursework (as much as 3 months in advance of the first semester). Following this, students will spend the next 12 to 18 months completing course work, developing research skills, and beginning a research project to be completed upon return to their home country. Students will spend six to eight months in their home country completing their research. The faculty mentor will travel to Africa during this period to help prepare the student for their thesis defense.

Criteria, Eligibility:

  • African students with a BS degree (or equivalent) in plant science, agronomy, horticulture, agricultural economics, wildlife ecology, entomology, soil science or microbiology or related discipline.
  • 3-5 years of work experience post-graduation in the agricultural sector.
  • A sincere and demonstrable passion to return to the home country and contribute to
    agricultural development, increased food security, and/or agribusiness development.
  • A letter of commitment from an African research institute, or university pledging to provide the fellow with in-kind research support for the African portion of their fellowship.
  • English language proficiency.
  • Acceptable scores on the GRE and TOEFL exams.
  • Ability to obtain a student visa (F-1) and travel to the USA from the home country.
  • Access to the internet in the home country.
  • For field research, access to appropriate resources for the student in Africa will be made by the faculty mentor.

How to apply: Candidates that hold a position in a scientific organization (e.g. university,
national program, international non-profit organization, etc.) in Kenya, Tanzania, Malawi,
Zimbabwe and Uganda are being considered at this time. A two-stage application process is required for the program. Before applying to UD’s graduate program, send the following
documents directly to AGRA (JNaibei@agra.org) with the subject line “Borel Global Fellows
Program.”

1) Statement of interest (2-page max)
2) Resume or curriculum vitae
3) Undergraduate transcripts
4) Up to three letters of reference from individuals who can judge your scholastic capability
and potential for research at the graduate level
5) A letter of commitment from an African research institute, or university pledging to provide the fellow with in-kind research support for the African portion of their fellowship
Following the first stage evaluation by AGRA, candidates will be invited to apply to the
University of Delaware. Details regarding UD’s graduate school admission can be found at: http://www.udel.edu/gradoffice/apply/

When to apply: The deadline for applications to AGRA is March 22, 2019. Applicants selected for further consideration will be notified by May 15, 2019 regarding how to make a formal application to the University of Delaware.

Financial support provided by the University of Delaware: Each Borel Global Fellow will
receive generous financial support including:

  • A stipend to cover living expenses while in Delaware (stipends vary by program; current minimum is $18,000/year)
  • A stipend of $1,125 per month covering up to eight months support for the African “in residence” portion of the fellowship.
  • A full waiver of tuition for up to 33 credits (currently valued at ~$53,000)
  • Round trip airfare to/from the USA (economy class)
  • Computer allowance of up to $1,000 (to be purchased at Delaware)
  • Reimbursement for the UD application fee ($75)
  • Financial support and travel allowance for the UD faculty mentor

Students are responsible for purchasing their own health insurance upon arrival to the
university; for details, costs and options, see: http://www.udel.edu/gradoffice/polproc/
insurance.html

Ding, Shanshan

Dr. Shanshan Ding, Assistance Professor of Statistics at the University of Delaware within the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources.

AGcelerate

UDsecondarylockup_AGEP

 

MISSION

Committed to diversity and inclusion, the AGcelerate Enrichment Program provides a supportive environment to promote the academic success, leadership development, and career preparedness for students in all majors of the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources. Participants develop a broad skill set and a close network of friends and mentors to ensure success both during and following their time at the University of Delaware.

The AGcelerate Enrichment Program offers tailored support for academic and professional success of students through:

  • Academic development and support
  • Math and chemistry tutoring on South Campus
  • Faculty Networking
  • Peer Mentoring
  • Career and internship exploration
  • Social and service learning activities

 

A bit more about us…

The AGcelerate Enrichment Program does not hold weekly or monthly meetings which student members are required to attend. Instead, our services and events are here for you when you need them- feel free to attend as many or as few as fit your schedule and benefit you. If there is academic support you need that we do not currently offer, let us know! We are always able to point you to available resources campus wide.

CHECK OUT WHAT WE’RE UP TO THIS SEMESTER ON THE SIDE BAR!

 

(above: Start the Semester Right Night)

 

 

Fischer Greenhouse Laboratory Growth Chamber Facility Reservation Form

 

To check availability of the growth chambers click to see their respective calendar.

Growth Chamber Descriptions
Chamber #1 (calendar)
Percival reach in model # I-60 LL
24 ft./sq. of shelve space
20 Watt T-12 fluorescent lights
Temperature and light control
Chamber #2 (calendar)
Percival reach in model # -60 LL VL
24 ft./sq. of shelve space
20 Watt T-12 fluorescent lights and 32 Watt T-8 fluorescent lights
Temperature and light control
Chamber #3 (calendar)
Percival reach in model # AR-75 L
16 ft./sq. of shelve space
32 Watt T-8 fluorescent lights and 40 Watt incandescent lights
Temperature and light control
Chamber #4 (calendar)
Conviron walk in model # TCR-240
96 ft./sq. of shelve space
59 Watt fluorescent and 40 watt incandescent lights
Temperature, light and humidity control
Chamber #5 (calendar) Conviron walk in model # C-10 10 M
96 ft./sq. shelve space
32 Watt T-8 florescent lights
Temperature, light and humidity control
Chamber #6 (calendar)
Conviron walk in model # C- 10 10 M
96 ft./sq.. shelve space
Lumigrow Lumibar L.E.D. lights
Temperature, light and humidity control
Chamber #7 (calendar)

Conviron walk in model # C-10 10 M
64 ft./sq. shelve space
54 Watt T-5 H/O florescent lights and 40 Watt incandescent lights
Temperature, light and humidity control
Chamber #8 (calendar)
Conviron reach in model # MTR 30
24 ft./sq. shelve space
72 Watt T-12 fluorescent lights and 40 Watt incandescent lights
Temperature, light and humidity control
Chamber #9 (calendar)
Conviron reach in model # PGC 20
16 ft./sq. of floor space (no shelves)
400 Watt metal halide lights and 400 Watt high pressure sodium lights
Temperature, light and humidity control


Please select a valid form

Foodborne Illness Outbreak Investigation

The University of Delaware Food Science Program presents educational materials to teach the science of foodborne illness, prevention, and outbreak resolution. The materials were developed by UD food microbiologists with insight of an advisory board of secondary educators and support of a USDA award 3. The content is multifaceted with a presentation, case studies, video, and web-based activities.

  • The Power Point™ presentation, Introduction to Foodborne Illness and Surveillance for Foodborne Illness, features over 70 slides on basic food microbiology, disease surveillance and epidemiology. An audio file accompanies the presentation for more background information for the educator.
  • Case studies immerse students in the role of public health investigator in foodborne illness outbreak investigations. Case studies are based on actual outbreaks that occurred in the United States and which dramatically impacted scientific understanding and other societal issues of trade, economics, and regulations. Learning concepts of the case studies include the different etiologies of foodborne illness, experimental design, data collection and handling, epidemiology, food safety strategies, good agricultural practices, communication, societal impact and regulatory outcomes of foodborne illness outbreaks. Teacher and student versions are provided.
  • A video, Foodborne Illness Investigation – Behind the Scenes, presents principles of microbial biochemistry for laboratory detection and identification of foodborne pathogens. The 14-minute video features varied visual elements to illustrate laboratory techniques such as culturing, gene-based assays, and immunoassays with emphasis on the biochemical similarities and differences among foodborne viruses, bacteria, and protozoan parasites. [ Teacher Supplement to Video ]
  • Three sets of web games reinforce concepts presented in the presentation, case studies, and video.
    • Outbreak Investigation – the student uncovers clues to a case file by matching terms related to outbreak investigations. The student must show mastery of concepts and work quickly to avoid loss of clues!
    • Tile Sorter™ includes four different exercises to order the sequence of events in an investigation and in laboratory procedures.
    • StudyMate™ features ten different exercises based on a question and answer bank related to concepts of food microbiology, outbreak investigations, laboratory detection, safety strategies, and critical numbers and roles. All activities can be used by one player; the Challenge game allows two players.

*Some games may not be supported with Internet Explorer.
1 Scallan, E, et al. 2011. Foodborne illness acquired in the United States – major pathogens. Emerg. Inf. Dis. 17(1): 7-15.
2 Scallan, E, et al. 2011. Foodborne illness acquired in the United States – unspecified agents. Emerg. Inf. Dis. 17(1): 16-22.
3 These educational materials were prepared by the University of Delaware based upon work supported by the Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture, under Award No. 2009-38414-19698. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Animal and Food Sciences Master’s Degrees

M.S. Degree in Animal Science
M.S. Degree in Food Science

Time Limitation

The programs are normally completed in 2 to 2 1/2 years of full-time study. All requirements for the Master’s degrees must be met within a maximum of ten consecutive semesters.

Credits

A minimum of 30 graduate credit hours is required, of which six credits must be six hours of thesis (869) or three hours of research (668/868) or a combination of both. The student must have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.00 (4 point scale) in order to receive the M.S. degree.

Core Courses

All students pursuing the M.S. degree will complete the following core courses; ANFS 865 Seminar (1 cr.) or ANFS 665 Seminar (1 cr.), and CHEM 527 Introductory Biochemistry (3 cr.) or CHEM 641 Biochemistry (3 cr.), and a statistics course [FREC 608 Research Methods (3 cr.), FREC 806 Research Techniques and Procedures (3 cr.), or equivalent].

Elective Courses

The remaining courses, totalling no less than 17 credit hours, will be determined by the student, faculty advisor and the Graduate Committee. These courses will vary among students depending on their specific needs to carry out their research and complete the program. Elective courses taken by students pursuing the M.S. in Animal Science include, but are not limited to, those with the ANFS, ANFS, BISC, CHEM, and FREC/STAT designations. Elective courses taken by students pursuing the M.S. in Food Science include, but are not limited to, those with the ANFS, ANFS, BISC, CHEM, FREC/STAT, CHEG, MATH, MEEG, PLSC, PHYS, AND NDTD designations.

Graduate Committee

Each student will have a Graduate Committee consisting of at least three faculty or professional members nominated by the faculty advisor and approved by the Department Chairperson. The advisor, who serves as the chair of the committee, must be a department faculty member. The Graduate Committee’s responsibility is the evaluation of the student’s program, thesis and examination. Participation from individuals from industry, government, or other academic departments on Graduate Committees may be required depending on the student’s area of research and the availability of faculty expertise within the Department. However, the number of “non-University of Delaware” committee members must not exceed 50% of the total number on the committee. Departmental Adjunct Faculty shall be considered as “non-University of Delaware” members in their participation on Graduate Committees. The Department Chairperson is considered an ex officio member of all Graduate Committees.

Research Proposal

A research topic shall be determined in conference between the faculty advisor and the student. The student will prepare a research proposal containing pertinent background material including a literature review, specific objectives of the research project and methods to be used in the planned studies. The proposal shall be submitted to the student’s Graduate Committee for review and approval of the research project. A proposal review meeting shall be held prior to the completion of the first year following matriculation. The proposal shall be submitted to the committee members at least ten working days prior to the scheduled meeting. The student will give an oral presentation summarizing the proposal. The committee members will question the student to verify that the student understands the research problem and the experimental approaches needed to address it. The Committee will also ensure that the student has the proper training and resources to do the research. As a result of the proposal review meeting, the student may be required to revise the proposal and/or take additional relevant course work.

Thesis

A thesis reporting the objectives, procedures, results, and a discussion of the student’s research shall be prepared according to the most recent edition of the Thesis Manual prepared by the Office of Graduate Studies. Copies of the thesis shall be submitted to the student’s Graduate Committee at least ten working days prior to the final examination.

It is highly recommended that the student present his/her research results at an appropriate scientific meeting and prepare a manuscript(s) based on his/her research results in a form suitable for publication. Published thesis research is acceptable as part of the thesis. At the discretion of the advisor, students may be required to provide a draft manuscript at the time of the defense.

Examination

Upon completion of the thesis, the student is required to pass an oral examination covering the thesis and allied areas of study. This examination is administered by the student’s Graduate Committee. The student will give an oral presentation (seminar) summarizing the thesis research. The committee members will question the student about the thesis and related subject areas to verify that the student fully understands the research findings and their implications. A favorable vote of at least two-thirds of the committee members is required for passing.

Animal and Food Sciences Ph.D.

Doctor of Philosophy Degree in Animal and Food Sciences

Admission

Students may enter the Ph.D. program after having previously earned a bachelor’s degree (B.A. or B.S.), M.S. degree, or Doctorate in Veterinary Medicine (DVM) or equivalent(s). A student who has been admitted to the Ph.D. program in Animal and Food Sciences may begin working toward the degree. However, he/she has no official status as a doctoral candidate until he/she has passed the comprehensive examination.

Areas of specialization

The Ph.D. degree in Animal and Food Sciences will be granted in the following major areas of specialization: animal nutrition, physiology, pathology, immunology, molecular biology/biotechnology, food science, and food engineering. In addition to the major area of specialization, the student’s advisor, in consultation with the Doctoral Committee, will determine whether the student should pursue a minor field of specialization. If a minor field of specialization is selected, the committee will judge the suitability of the field, relevance to the major area of specialization, and requirements for the minor.

Time limitation

A maximum of 14 consecutive semesters beyond the bachelor’s degree, or 10 consecutive semesters beyond the master’s degree, is allowed to complete the requirements for the Ph.D. degree.

Core courses and general requirements

All students pursuing the Ph.D. will complete the following core courses: ANFS 865 Seminar (1 cr.) or ANFS 865 Seminar (1 cr.); ANFS 969 Doctoral Dissertation (9-12 cr.); CHEM 641 Biochemistry (3 cr.); CHEM 642 Biochemistry (3 cr.); and a statistics course: (STAT 608 Research Methods (3 cr.), STAT 806 Research Techniques and Procedures (3 cr.), or equivalent). Beyond the core courses, no specific number of courses completed or credits earned are uniformly required. The student and advisor, in concert with the Doctoral Committee, will select appropriate course work based on the student’s background and major and minor (if applicable) area(s) of specialization for the Ph.D. Consideration will be given to the student’s prior training and experience at the undergraduate (B.A. or B.S.) and M.S. and/or D.V.M. (if applicable) level(s). Students with more advanced training and experience will need fewer courses to complete their Ph.D. program. General requirements for the Ph.D. are based on a period of residency, writing of a satisfactory research proposal and dissertation, and passing the comprehensive and the final oral examinations. The candidate’s doctoral program will consist of a combination of Doctoral Committee-approved formal courses, seminars, individual study, and research credits as needed by the student.

Residency requirement

At least one continuous academic year (two semesters) must be devoted to full-time study as a registered student in the major field at the University of Delaware. Full-time study consists of a minimum load of nine credit hours per semester.

Advisor and doctoral committee

Most applicants to the Ph.D. program identify a potential faculty advisor at the time of application. If that faculty member is unable (due to lack of space, funding, etc.) to advise the student, then another advisor who is acceptable to the student is sought. If an advisor can not be identified, then the student is not admitted to the Ph.D. program. As a condition of admission into the program, a faculty member must agree to serve as the student’s graduate advisor for the balance of the student’s program. A student may change advisors but this is very rare.

A Doctoral Committee will be appointed within six months following matriculation. The committee shall consist of not less than four nor more than six faculty or professional members nominated by the graduate advisor and approved by the Department Chairperson. Participation from industry, government or other academic departments on the Doctoral Committee may be required depending on the student’s area of research. At least one member of the committee shall be from outside the Department of Animal and Food Sciences. However, no more than half of the committee members shall be from outside the Department. Departmental Adjunct Faculty shall be considered as “outside” members in their participation on Doctoral Committees. The committee is responsible for approving the student’s course work and research program. The committee will prepare, administer, and evaluate the student’s comprehensive and final examinations and will supervise and approve the dissertation. The student’s faculty advisor serves as chair of the Doctoral Committee. A faculty member may serve as the graduate advisor for a student in both his/her M.S. and Ph.D. programs, although this is not common. Students who have completed the M.S. degree in Animal Science or the M.S. degree in Food Science are generally encouraged to pursue the Ph.D. at other universities.

Research proposal

Advancement to degree candidacy requires successful oral defense of a research proposal. The proposal will be submitted to the Doctoral Committee at least ten working days prior to the scheduled defense. The student will give an oral presentation summarizing the proposal. The committee members will question the student to verify that the student understands the research problem and the experimental approaches needed to address it. The committee will also ensure that the student has the proper training and resources to do the research. As a result of the meeting, the student may be required to revise the proposal and/or take additional course work. The research proposal defense should precede the comprehensive examination.

Comprehensive examination

Successful completion of the comprehensive examination is required of all Ph.D. students prior to their admission to candidacy. The examination normally is given to the student after completion of all course work and selection of a dissertation topic. The student is required to have a minimum grade point average of 3.0 (4 point scale) at the time of the examination. The examination will cover the student’s major and minor (if applicable) areas of study. Each member of the student’s Doctoral Committee will submit examination questions to the student via the advisor who will administer the written portion of the comprehensive examination. Following completion of the written exam, the advisor will return the student responses to the appropriate committee member for their evaluation. Students passing the written examination may continue for the oral portion of the comprehensive examination generally given within one month of the completion of the written examination. In the oral portion of the comprehensive examination the student must appear before all committee members and demonstrate competency in this forum. A favorable vote by a majority of the committee is required for passing. Based on the performance of the student in the comprehensive examination, the committee may recommend one of the following actions:

The student be admitted to candidacy, without qualification or subject to fulfillment of certain conditions.

  • The student be reexamined at later date.
  • The student be disapproved unconditionally for the degree.

Dissertation

The ability to conduct independent research and competence in scholarly writing must be demonstrated by the preparation of a dissertation on a topic related to the major area of specialization in accordance with the regulations of the Office of Graduate Studies. The contents and conclusions of the dissertation must be defended at the time of the Final Oral Examination and approved by the Doctoral Committee. Copies of the dissertation must be available in the departmental office at least ten working days before the date of the Final Oral Examination. Preparation of (a) manuscript(s) for publication of the information contained within the dissertation is expected prior to, or within one month after, approval of the dissertation by the committee at the Final Oral Examination.

Final oral examination

Upon recommendation of the Doctoral Committee, a Final Oral Examination of the dissertation will be scheduled for the doctoral candidate who has satisfied all other requirements for the degree. The examination must be scheduled at least three weeks prior to the time the examination is to be held. The examination, which is open to the public, shall be related in a large part to the dissertation but it may cover the entire field of study of the candidate. The examination will be administered by the student’s Doctoral Committee. The student will give an oral presentation (seminar) summarizing the dissertation research. Committee members will question the student about the dissertation and related subject areas to verify that the candidate fully understands the research findings and their implications. A favorable vote of a majority of the members of the committee is required for passing. If the candidate fails, it is the responsibility of the Doctoral Committee to determine whether he/she may take another examination.

Careers and Internships

Your future is bright with a major in our college!

Job-Outlook-for-CANR-thumb
Click Here For Job Outlook For College of Agriculture and Natural Resources Graduates

CAREERS…

UD’s Career Service Center team can partner with you in your career planning process as you engage in thinking about and taking steps towards realizing your career goals.  From “mapping” your career, writing a resume, practicing your interviewing techniques, networking and more, the Career Services staff is here to assist you.

Be sure to register as early as your freshman year on our Handshake , UD’s One Stop Shop for all jobs and other career resources.

INTERNSHIPS…

Having an internship can boost your resume, provide you with valuable real world educational experience, and help you to decide whether or not a career field is for you. In addition, you may get paid or earn college credit, and you will enrich your college experience!

Where to look:

Handshake

CANR Affiliated Internships

Talk of Townsend – This is a blog maintained by the Office of Undergraduate Student Services for the purpose of sharing information about upcoming events, important academic deadlines, career and internship opportunities, news from student clubs and more.

Advisement

Keeping track of your academic progress towards graduation should be your No. 1 priority! You have been assigned one or more faculty or professional academic advisors to assist you during your UD academic career. They are just one of the many resources available to provide you with academic support. Staying on top of your academic progress is key to having a successful and rewarding college experience.

 

Office of Undergraduate Student Services talk-of-townsend
104 Townsend Hall
Newark, DE 19716
Ph (302) 831-2508
Fax (302) 831-1360
Email: anr-academics@udel.edu

Call or email us anytime! 

Giving

Gifts from individuals, companies, and foundations provide the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (CANR) with needed resources to expand our educational, research and extension programs. These vital gifts support faculty in their cutting edge research, and help train the next generation of leaders who will work to feed the world and sustain our natural resources.

Your gift may be designated to the department or fund of your choice with the confidence that it will be used for the purpose you intend. The College’s giving opportunities are described below.

Annual Support

College and departments

CANR utilizes unrestricted funds to support initiatives like:

  • Student Enrichment—Opportunities for student learning outside of the classroom, including internships with Landscape Architecture, Botanic Gardens, Wetlands Restoration, Extension and the UDairy Creamery
  • Special Projects—Unique learning opportunities (e.g. UDairy Creamery or UD Fresh to You) that engage and  enrich the local community and give students real-world experiences invaluable to their careers
  • Scholarships—Academic and need-based awards that keep students focused on their education rather than how they can finance it
  • Graduate Student Support—Opportunities for students to participate in knowledge discovery  and translation that help feed the world and protect the planet
  • Farm Operations—Critical support of the college’s 350-acre farm, dairy, wetlands and woodlands that serves as an outdoor laboratory for students and faculty
  • Cooperative Extension—Collaborative work between UD and the local community to provide valuable consultation and education to individuals, businesses and communities to solve problems, develop skills and build a better future.

Gifts can be directed to CANR and to each of our departments, centers and programs:

Major Gift Support

Capital Projects and Needs

Cooperative Extension exists to extend knowledge and change lives in four areas of focus: 4H & Youth Development; Agriculture and Natural Resources; Lawn and Garden; and Family & Consumer Sciences. UD celebrated the 100th Anniversary of Cooperative Extension nationwide in 2014, we created a Centennial Fund to support a variety of operational needs associated with our extension efforts in New Castle, Kent and Sussex counties. These needs may include staff support, programmatic support, and innovation of new programs and delivery methods.  Learn more about the UD Cooperative Extension’s Centennial Fund.

Special projects that impact CANR Students:

UDairy Creamery established in 2008, produces premium ice cream made with milk from the cows on the farm at UD’s College of Agriculture & Natural Resources.  Founded on science, sustainability and entrepreneurship, the Creamery:

  • Focuses on sustaining agriculture and natural ecosystems in the face of land use change;
  • Is a student-centered, faculty supported enterprise;
  • Cuts across many UD colleges and disciplines in its educational efforts; and 
  • Reaches out to the community and engages alumni.

UD Botanic Gardens (UDBG) – a series of twelve gardens on fifteen acres, UDBG serves as a research center, a laboratory, and a classroom in which studies in plant biology, botany, plant pathology, landscape design, ornamental horticulture, and entomology are pursued through experiential learning.  UDBG also maintains a diverse and dynamic living plant collection that stimulates and engages, with more than 3,000 species and cultivars of perennials, shrubs and trees.

Facilities
Housing CANR teaching and research laboratories.
Worrilow Hall houses CANR teaching and research laboratories.

Worrilow Hall, constructed in 1980, serves as the College of Agriculture & Natural Resources’ primary research and teaching facility.  Renovations to this vital space will greatly support the College in its goals to: increase undergraduate and graduate enrollment; increase faculty prominence and research; increase hands on problem based learning and instructional opportunities for undergraduate CANR students; promote interdisciplinary research and collaboration with partners outside of the college; increase and maintain a sustainable research funding stream.  The college is currently working with architects on renovation plans for Worrilow Hall.

Endowed (permanent) Funds

student-feeding-calfUndergraduate Enrichment Funds are used to support outstanding students by offering valuable paid research opportunities.  Recipients of enrichment funds receive a unique opportunity to work alongside faculty in solving current and challenging research problems by combining classroom concepts with real-world implications.

Undergraduate Scholarships provide tuition assistance to students who demonstrate exceptional merit based academic promise or financial need with specific criteria determined by the donor. The University’s annual Celebration of Scholarship program affords the opportunity for donors to meet the recipients of the scholarships and awards.

Graduate Fellowships provide nine-month stipends of $22,500 for first-year graduate students, essential for the recruitment of top doctoral students.

Career Development Professorships provide an annual stipend of $50,000 used to recruit and retain talented young faculty. The stipend complements their compensation with funds for special research, speaking engagements, conferences and publications.

Endowed Professorships & Endowed Chairs are highly prized by outstanding faculty due to their prestige and academic value. Presently, 7 percent of CANR faculty hold named professorships. An Endowed Professorship/Chair is a most coveted position with funds providing a portion of the professor’s annual expenses.

The University Board of Trustees sets the endowment income expenditure rate. Currently the spending rate is approximately 4.0 percent.

Does my company have a matching gifts program? I’d like to give now!

CANR Campus

The College of Agriculture and Natural Resources has two major teaching, research, and extension complexes: one on the UD Newark Campus and the other in Sussex County. Numerous, additional lands and facilities throughout the state support the college’s efforts. With our “350-acre classroom” just steps from UD’s main campus, we can provide hands on experience with animals, crop plants, wetlands, forest, greenhouses and more for every student in every program.

Townsend Hall
Townsend Hall

Townsend Hall

Townsend Hall - Housing CANR administrative, departmental and faculty offices, laboratories and teaching rooms.

Worrilow Hall
Worrilow Hall

Worrilow Hall

Housing CANR teaching and research laboratories.

UD Dairy
UD Dairy

UD Dairy

Providing faculty and students close proximity to a real-life, working dairy farm that serves as a model for environmental best management practices.

Fischer Greenhouse Laboratory
Fischer Greenhouse Laboratory

Fischer Greenhouse Laboratory

A professionally-managed suite of growth chambers and glass house facilities serving the research and education community. More here: http://canr.udel.edu/fischer-greenhouse/

Webb Farm
Webb Farm

Webb Farm

The Webb Farm, located off of Route 72 in Newark, houses facilities for the college’s registered Angus cattle herd, Dorset sheep flock and horse herd; and includes a lambing barn, livestock arena and the new equine facility.

Equine Teaching Facility
Equine Teaching Facility

Equine Teaching Facility

A new facility used for equine science courses, to provide continuing education opportunities for local and regional equine veterinarians, and to support Extension outreach efforts for Delaware's growing equine industry.

Ecology Woods
Ecology Woods

Ecology Woods

35 acres of forested lands used for research and teaching in the areas of ecology, entomology, and wildlife conservation.

CANR Analytical Laboratories
CANR Analytical Laboratories

CANR Analytical Laboratories

UD-CANR has a variety of laboratories that provide analytical services to members of the public and university communities.

Natural Resources Area
Natural Resources Area

Natural Resources Area

Including a 10-acre warm season prairie recently established to restore an old landfill, two wildflower meadows, and numerous wetlands and stream corridors.

Apiaries
Apiaries

Apiaries

An area where beehives are kept for use in entomological research, teaching, and extension, and as a source of pollinators for local croplands.

Allen Biotechnology Laboratory
Allen Biotechnology Laboratory

Allen Biotechnology Laboratory

A world class research laboratory used to address basic and applied research in infectious diseases with emphasis on epidemiology, pathogenesis, vaccine development and evaluation.

Delaware Biotech Institute
Delaware Biotech Institute

Delaware Biotech Institute

Our Institute is the physical home to a number of research laboratories with scientists, students, and faculty working on problems related to agriculture, human health, and energy and the environment.

New Castle County Cooperative Extension
New Castle County Cooperative Extension

New Castle County Cooperative Extension

The hub for Cooperative Extension programming in New Castle County

UDairy Creamery
UDairy Creamery

UDairy Creamery

An ice cream manufacturing facility and storefront exists for students to learn business management and make ice cream from the milk of our own dairy cows!

University of Delaware Botanic Gardens
University of Delaware Botanic Gardens

University of Delaware Botanic Gardens

Wetland Creation Site
Wetland Creation Site

Wetland Creation Site

In September of 2008, a wetland was installed on the UD Farm, in what was once a pasture for dairy cows. While the primary goal of this project is to improve water quality and enhance habitat, the site will also be used for research and teaching related to water quality, soils, ecology, and horticulture.

Paradee Center
Paradee Center

Paradee Center

The Kent County hub for Cooperative Extension programming for the University, business, government, and civic and corporate institutions throughout the county.

Carvel Research and Education Center
Carvel Research and Education Center

Carvel Research and Education Center

The hub for Sussex County Cooperative Extension housing educators and agents who provide educational programming, 325 acres of farmland for agronomic research, and 35 acres of natural areas.

Lasher Laboratory
Lasher Laboratory

Lasher Laboratory

Georgetown-The primary poultry diagnostic laboratory in the State, providing rapid and comprehensive diagnostic services to commercial poultry producers as well as to the owners of small non-commercial hobby and backyard flocks.

Top 10 Reasons To Choose CANR

  • Small college within a mid-sized university – It’s the best of both worlds!  Benefit from close interaction with your faculty and fellow students, but also enjoy the amenities and resources of a mid-sized university.
  • You always count! – You won’t be in a class with hundreds of other students at CANR. In most cases, two-thirds of your classes will have fewer than 30 students. You’ll have lots of opportunities for great discussions and will have professors who know you by name!
  • Lots of opportunities to make a difference – Whether you love animals, theater, sports, plants…or grilling, there is a club for you! With 18 clubs within the College of Agriculture & Natural Resources and almost 300 organizations across the University, you have lots of opportunities to get involved and make a significant difference in our community!
  • Our 350 Acre Classroom– The best classroom right on main campus…our 350-acre facility includes a dairy farm, equine barns, statistics and experimental economics labs, botanic gardens, greenhouses, ecology woods, a wetland, an apiary, a creamery and much, much, more! In fact, we’re one of only a handful of colleges in the nation that has a working farm right on campus.
  • Hands-on experiences – Learn by doing and seeing.  As early as freshman year, students gain practical experience both inside and outside of the classroom.  Students in every major may work in a lab, in the gardens, on the farm, or intern with local businesses and organizations to expand their knowledge.
  • The World of Research – In the College of Agriculture & Natural Resources, the word “research” goes beyond the stereotype of white coats and sterile labs. Research opportunities are available in our laboratories, greenhouses, forest, gardens, and with local industries, and organizations as early as freshman year.
  • Exceptional Teaching– Our renowned faculty have been recognized both nationally and internationally for both their teaching and research.  They are accessible, too, and take pride working side-by-side with students. Many have earned outstanding academic advisement awards. Their doors are always open!
  • Study abroadThere’s nothing better than learning more about the world and your place in it than exploring beyond our borders. As citizens in a global community, our students enjoy the opportunity to explore the world including Tanzania, New Zealand, Australia, Brazil, Dominica, Costa Rica, and more!
  • Jobs After College – Not only will you be prepared when you graduate from CANR, but you will be in a great position to secure a job. Agriculture and natural resource professionals are needed now more than ever. In fact, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) reports that there are two jobs to every graduate of agriculture and related sciences.
  • We are here to help – CANR is a student-centered college where faculty and staff want you to be successful. The office of Undergraduate Services stands ready to help you in whatever way we can to make your college years productive and memorable.

Rieger, Mark

This is the faculty profile for Mark Rieger, Dean and Professor in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources at the University of Delaware.

Contact Us

Location

531 South College Avenue
Townsend Hall
Newark, Delaware 19716-2103
(302) 831-2501

Current and future undergraduate students

Kimberly Yackoski, Sr. Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Services
Email: anr-academics@udel.edu
Phone: (302) 831-2508

Graduate students

University of Delaware Office of Graduate & Professional Education

Public & Media Relations

Dante LaPenta, Communications Manager
Email: dlapenta@udel.edu
Phone: (302) 831-1355

Cooperative Extension

Michelle Rodgers, Associate Dean and Director of Cooperative Extension and Outreach
Phone: (302) 831-2504
Fax: (302) 831-6758

New Castle County Office
461 Wyoming Road
Newark, DE 19716
Phone: (302) 831-2506
Fax: (302) 831-8934

Kent County Office
University of Delaware Paradee Center
69 Transportation Circle
Dover , DE 19901
Phone: (302) 730-4000
Fax: (302) 735-8130
Mail Code: D270

Sussex County Office
Elbert N. and Ann V. Carvel Research and Education Center
16483 County Seat Highway
Georgetown , DE 19947
Phone: (302) 856-7303
Fax: (302) 856-1845
Mail code: S890

A Message from the Dean

dean-rieger-students-forum

There has never been a more immediate and pressing need for agriculture and natural resource professionals than now. The current generation of professionals entering the workplace must find ways to double food production without increasing the amount of land and water devoted to agriculture – truly one of the world’s grand challenges.  The students who enroll in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (CANR) want more than just jobs; they want careers that matter and provide opportunities to make a difference in the world. I can’t think of nobler professions than those dedicated to preserving our earth for future generations.

We take great pride that about 94% of our College’s recent graduates secured jobs in their fields of study with starting salaries in the range of $35,000 – $45,000. The median salaries are higher than those for more popular college majors such as biology, psychology, education, political science, and the arts and humanities. In fact, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) reports that there are two jobs to every graduate of agriculture and related sciences.

You might also be interested to know that more than a quarter of graduates from colleges of agriculture and related sciences go on to earn a graduate or professional degree, where annual earnings can even double. Molecular biology, animal science, population ecology, natural resource management, food science, applied economics and statistics, water quality, and wildlife conservation are just some of the high-demand programs that we offer. Our graduate programs provide a pathway to academia, industry and agency careers for those whose goal it is to lead change in agriculture and environmental issues.

Thousands of successful alumni around the world are evidence of the academic excellence rooted at the College of Agriculture & Natural Resources.  A committed and renowned faculty engages students with hands-on experiences, research opportunities and connections to communities, both at home and overseas. With a distinctive “350-acre classroom,” our Newark Farm students gain practical experience by actively testing their knowledge in real-world settings.  We are proud to be one of only a handful of colleges in the nation that actually feature a working farm right on its campus. Our student farm, however, is more than that – it offers woodlands, wetlands, streams, grasslands, equine and large animal facilities, a working dairy, as well as a creamery. Aiding the community also continues to be at the cornerstone of CANR. Now more than ever, UD Cooperative Extension, the outreach arm of the College, shares knowledge with those citizens who need it most — especially as it relates to today’s high stakes regarding health, nutrition and financial literacy.

Making a world of difference has never been more important. We invite you to learn more about us and schedule a visit. We’ll be glad to work with you to chart a path to a meaningful, well-paying career. Feed the world. Protect the planet. That’s the motto we live by. Join us.

Sincerely,

 

Mark Rieger, Ph.D.
Dean

About Us

Our college is an educationally rich environment bursting with life and learning, and where students are invited and encouraged to be full partners in their education.  As an undergraduate student, we will strongly encourage you to question, to discuss, and to develop the expertise necessary to formulate solutions to real world challenges in whatever career you pursue.

We hope you find everything you need on our website. If you have further questions please feel free contact us.

Latest CANR News

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Ag Day Frequently Asked Questions

What is Ag Day? Ag Day is a community event that brings agriculture and natural resources to life for the approximately 8,000 people who attend each year.  Through educational exhibits, tours, and activities, our exhibitors educate everyone, from schoolchildren to homeowners, senior citizens to teenagers, about the world of agriculture and natural resources.  Adding to the fun are our many supplemental vendors, who provide food and entertainment for our guests. What goes on at Ag Day? – More than 90 different educational and interactive exhibits – Children’s games and activities – Livestock display with UD farm animals – Musical entertainment – Tractor-pulled hayrides around the UD farm complex – Plant sales (trees, shrubs, perennials, vegetable and bedding plants.) – Educational lectures – Lots and lots of food! What is Art in the Garden? Art in the Garden is an annual outdoor sculpture exhibition put on by students from the University of Delaware’s Art Department, under the direction of assistant professor of art, David Meyer.  Click here for more information. Who should attend? There is something for everyone—children, teenagers and adults.  Ag Day is a true “family event!” What is the cost? Parking and admission are free.  There are nominal charges for food, sales, and some activities, but there are many free exhibits and events.  Entertainment is free. Where do I park? Parking is available in the UD Ice Arena and Field House lots, as well as in the north and south parking lots of the former Chrysler site. Overflow parking is also available at the DART/SEPTA lot. Handicapped parking (tag or plate must be displayed) is available in the northern most area of the ice arena lot. Please use crosswalks! Is Ag Day handicapped and stroller accessible? Yes, and there will be limited handicapped parking in the Ice Arena lot; however, there is a bit of a distance between the parking area and the event. What is the UDBG Plant Sale? This large-scale plant sale that runs the week of Ag Day and on the day of. On Ag Day, the sale starts at 9:30 a.m. (1/2 hour earlier than Ag Day). Questions should be referred to 302-831-2531 or see the UDBG website. Can I bring my dog (or any other animal)? Please don’t!  The crowds, strollers and noise at Ag Day make pets very uncomfortable.  There are also many guests who are scared of dogs.  The clean-up issue is also a reason why we ask you to please leave all pets at home! Who plans Ag Day? The College of Agriculture and Natural Resources has a team of students and staff who are responsible for planning the event. For all questions, please contact Grace Wisser at gwisser@udel.edu. When is the Annual Lawn Mower Tune-Up? The Lawn Mower Tune-Up is not a part of Ag Day. It is sponsored by three student organizations and is typically scheduled a few weekends prior to Ag Day.

Ag Day 2019

Ag Day 2019 Cultivating Our LegacyAg Day is organized by a student planning committee.

Join the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources for a special edition of Ag Day as we celebrate the 150th anniversary of the University of Delaware becoming a land-grant institution. 

Members of the campus and neighboring communities are encouraged to join the college for its annual signature event — a day filled with music, exhibitors, great food, and fun for all ages on the UD Farm.

Visitors can experience everything from livestock exhibits, 4-H arts and crafts, hayride farm tours, and much more.

Both admission and parking are free and the event is open to the public, rain or shine.

This year’s theme is “Cultivating A Legacy,” a nod to Ed Kee’s book chronicling the college’s 150 years of research, teaching, and extension. 

Note: For the safety of our visitors and animal exhibits, please leave your pets at home.

Dairy Science Research, Teaching and Extension

dairyscienceresearch

Delaware’s dairy industry is a vital segment of the agricultural economies of both the state and the nation. In Delaware, milk sales rank fifth in agricultural receipts and top the income of all livestock products except poultry. The College of Agriculture and Natural Resources at the University of Delaware has a long history of innovative research and rigorous teaching programs in dairy science. The dairy science research, teaching, and extension programs of the University of Delaware work cooperatively to integrate the findings from basic and applied research into cost-effective management practices for the dairy industry in the Northeast region, nationally, and abroad.

cow_farmFacts about the the U.S. and Delaware Dairy Industries

  • United States milk production rose 16% from 1997-2006, reaching nearly 182 billion pounds of milk produced annually, leading all countries in cow milk production
  • Over $28 billion dollars worth of milk are produced each year by the U.S. dairy industry, with the retail value of dairy products totaling about $100 billion/year
  • Dairy sales comprise almost 10% of all U.S. agricultural income
  • Dairy product sales rank in the top two agricultural commodities in 14 states
  • Dairy products represent the top agricultural cash receipts in 9 states
  • For statistics on the dairy industry visit the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service website.