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Outbreak Investigation

The case study presents a scenario in which food has been implicated as a vehicle for an illness outbreak of microbiological origin. Students assume various roles to investigate and solve the outbreak and to evaluate approaches to prevent recurrence. The case study can be used in written format that could be completed individually or in groups as a class or homework assignment. Interactive and hands-on elements are also available such that the investigation involves manipulatives, puzzles, and game features for the same educational content as presented in the written version. Students can be assigned to groups to address one phase of the investigation and then share findings with the class; a presentation on the case study is provided to support student discourse.

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Group A Visuals

Group A Visuals for Conserve Exercise

Group B Visuals

Conserve Exercise Group B Visuals

Group C Visuals

Group C Visuals for Conserve Exercise

Group D Visuals

Group D Visuals for Conserve Exercise

Group E Visuals

Group E Visuals for Conserve Exercise

Group F Visuals

Educator Advisory Board

CONSERVE Educational Materials

For Educator Advisory Board Confidential Review

The CONSERVE Education Team is in the process of developing educational materials for the K-12 community on the topics of agricultural water availability, quality, and societal impacts. Our goals are to create ready-to-use, multifaceted educational resources that complement current curricula, align with education content standards, and respect classroom needs and constraints.

A description of the resources is provided at the Resource Description tab. The materials available for review can be accessed under the Elementary School, Middle School, and High School headings. There is some overlap for materials we believe are appropriate for all ages, whereas other resources are targeted for different age groups.

The versions you are invited to evaluate are, in some cases, partial drafts because we would like feedback before proceeding. Please review these educational resources confidentially and provide feedback on the provided online evaluation form. Please use a separate evaluation form for each resource reviewed. Feel free to view and comment on materials for all ages, but please be sure to provide comment on the content developed for the age group you currently instruct.

We greatly appreciate your time and expertise to help us make these valuable educational resources.

Thank you!

Elementary School

Middle School

In Development: Web-based Interactives – Water Sampling and Testing; Presentation – Food Safety and Water Resources; Lab Exercise; Assessment Questions

High School

In Development: Web-based Interactives – Water Sampling and Testing; Presentation – Food Safety and Water Resources; Lab Exercise; Assessment Questions

Li Ph.D., Yihang

Faculty, Yihang Li, Ph.D., research interest includes gastrointestinal (GI) health can be evaluated by nutrient transport capacity and barrier integrity, which plays a critical role in modern animal industry that is centered in optimizing feed efficiency and enhancing disease prevention. GI function can be regulated by complicate signals from luminal nutrients/microbiome, body energy/metabolic status, gut immune activity, and central/enteric nerve system. The rapid turnover rate of intestinal epithelium (5-7 days) allows GI to adjust any potential miscommunication of these signals thus adapt environmental change. Therefore how well the GI be able to respond to environmental change, and how efficient the GI adjust itself in the corresponding environment is important for maintaining its function and optimal health. Understanding the basic physiology of GI adaptation is the foundation of developing novel feeding strategy and precise nutrition requirement in cases of early development and production stress.

My research interest is to bring novel knowledge on nutritional interventions and/or physiological stress during early development, which have immediate or long-term benefits to gut health, thus ultimately reduce animal production costs, and also contribute knowledge of relevance to human gut health.

Petit Hop Field

Petit Hop Field was installed at the University of Delaware to provide educational and experiential learning opportunities for students as well as outreach and best management practice techniques to local farmers, growers and home brewing hobbyists. The field is comprised of 90 poles set up 15 feet apart that weigh up to 800 pounds — each with galvanized steel wires that hold the hop bines in place. It will take around 1,000 hours to pick the field, which is comprised of 980 plants. Varieties of hops grown on the field will include AlphaAroma and Cascade, among others. The hops field will have an assortment to meet market demands.

Close up photos of the hops in the field.The hops field will serve as a resource to show growers what it takes to start a field, which can represent a huge return on investment if set up properly. Area growers can learn integrated pest management techniques as well as learn from our successes and failures in planting. The hops will be available to local breweries and, hopefully, spawn collaborations between UD and the Delaware community. With a Department of Plant and Soil Sciences in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, research opportunities will abound for professors and students with an interest in plant pathology.

Petit Hop Field was created through the benevolent support of Reverend Barbara Hebner, retired adjunct professor of women’s studies. The field is named in memory of Rev. Hebner’s daughter, Hilary A. Petit ’86. Hilary received a B.A. in biological sciences from UD and a Master’s and Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine from Colorado State University. She was a practicing veterinarian and became fond of home brewing while living in Alaska. Rev. Hebner’s philanthropy is a loving tribute to Hilary’s passion and enables UD students the opportunity to learn the art and science of brewing that Hilary so enjoyed.

2018 Season Time Lapse Clip

Conserve

We are facilitating the adoption of transformative on‐farm solutions that enable the safe use of nontraditional irrigation water on food crops and effectively reduce the nation’s agricultural water challenges that are exacerbated by climate change. - conservewaterforfood.org

This work is funded by the United States Department of Agriculture – National Institute of Food and Agriculture grant number 2016-66800725064.

Nomination Forms

CANR Inclusive Excellence Award (Faculty/Staff)

The CANR Inclusive Excellence Award is awarded to a staff or faculty member biennially in odd-numbered years. The award recognizes individuals whose work embodies UD’s Inclusive Excellence initiative to advance inclusive excellence within the institution or community. The evaluation criteria (below) serve as a guideline for developing the nomination and nominee’s statement.

The award is based on the principle of inclusion as defined by the American Association of Colleges and Universities (AAC&U), rewarding those who have shown excellence in:

“The active, intentional, and ongoing engagement with diversity—in the curriculum, in the co-curriculum, and in communities…”

Awardees will be recognized at the CANR Convocation Ceremony in May and receive a monetary gift of $2000, an award certificate and a brick engraved with their name to be placed in the Dunham Garden.

  • Deadline: the graduate student’s major advisor may submit nominations online by March 1

Deadline for Submissions: March 1

Nomination form

Rules of Eligibility for the Award

  • Employee nominees must be a full-time CANR staff or faculty member.
  • Former recipients of the CANR Inclusive Excellence Award are ineligible.
  • Nominations must be voluntary.

Process

  • Nominations open December 1 of even-numbered years and close March 1 of odd-numbered years.
  • Nominations are submitted online and should address the definition and core principles of inclusive excellence as applicable to the individual nominee (link here).
  • Nominees are notified shortly after March 1 and asked to submit a two-page impact statement that addresses their contributions toward inclusive excellence. Evidentiary materials may be appended to the statement.
  • The selection committee is appointed by the dean. The committee submits a ranked list of potential awardees (with rationale) to the dean for a final decision.
  • The award winner is notified by May 1 and is recognized at the CANR Convocation Ceremony in odd-numbered years.

Evaluation Criteria

The following four criteria are based on the principles of inclusive excellence identified in the University’s Diversity Action Plan, Inclusive Excellence: A plan for diversity at UD. By virtue of one’s position and responsibilities, contributions to each of UD’s principles of inclusive excellence will vary among nominees for this award. The selection committee evaluates the overall commitment to inclusive excellence and impact on diversity in one or more of the following categories:

  • Engagement in efforts to recruit and retain diverse staff, faculty, students and/or community partners to CANR
  • Contributions to curricular and/or co-curricular activities that affirm our educational mission to develop an inclusive and diverse student body
  • Engagement with professional development and educational opportunities that leverage diversity as a core competency
  • Contributions to efforts to improve campus climate within UD and/or strengthen community engagement to advance inclusivity and diversity

CANR FACULTY AWARDS

CANR Excellence in Teaching and Advising Award

  • $3,000 awarded biennially in odd-numbered years (i.e. 2019, 2021, 2023, etc.)
  • For eminence in teaching, mentoring and advising
  • Deadline: Students, faculty and staff submit nominations online by March 1 of odd-numbered years

CANR Excellence in Teaching and Advising

Deadline for Submissions: March 1 of odd-numbered years

Nomination form

The CANR Excellence in Teaching and Advising Award is awarded biennially in odd-numbered years.  The award recognizes CANR faculty involved in teaching, mentoring and advising students.  Individuals may be nominated for teaching, advising, or both teaching and advising.

Nature of the Award

  • One award presented biennially in odd-numbered years (i.e. 2019, 2021, etc.).
  • For eminence in teaching, mentoring and advising.
  • Individuals may be nominated for teaching, advising, or both teaching and advising.
  • The awardee is recognized at the CANR Convocation Ceremony in May and receives:
    • $3,000
    • an award certificate
    • a brick engraved with their name to be placed in the Dunham Garden

Deadline: Students, faculty and staff submit nominations online by March 1 of odd-numbered years.

Rules of Eligibility for the Award

  • Nominee must be a full-time CANR faculty member.
  • The nominee may teach either undergraduate or graduate students, or both.
  • Former recipients of the award are ineligible.

Process

  • Nominations open December 1 of even-numbered years and close March 1 of odd-numbered years.
  • Nominations are submitted online and should address the Criteria of Excellence.
  • Nominees are notified electronically and must submit a current CV within 7 days of notification.
  • The selection committee is appointed by the dean. The committee evaluates the nomination package (unsolicited nomination letters and the CV) against the rubric.
  • The award winner is notified electronically by May 1 and is recognized at the CANR Convocation Ceremony in odd-numbered years.
  • Applicants will be evaluated on criteria based on the UD Excellence in Teaching Award.

Criteria of Excellence

1.     Intellectually demanding and rigorous (10 points max)

  • is thought-provoking and intellectually demanding
  • relates course material to other fields, contemporary issues, student experiences

2.     Deeply committed to teaching and students (10 points max)

  • is enthusiastic about teaching
  • is conscientious, organized, and well-prepared for class
  • is concerned about individual students and their development
  • is readily available to students
  • has participated in or led professional growth opportunities
  • has served as a teaching mentor to other faculty and graduate students
  • has served on committees or working groups related to teaching and learning

3.     Communication with students and relaying of course content (10 points max)

  • provides clear expectations, relevant assignments, and ample feedback
  • presents material clearly, asks good questions, and adjusts strategies as necessary to facilitate understanding
  • engages students and stimulates participation
  • is open-minded, fair, and respectful of differences among students

4.     Has positive and lasting impact on students (10 points max)

  • inspires students to excel
  • promotes critical reading, thinking, and writing
  • produces more learning than in other courses
  • affects students’ educational and career goals and achievements5.     Engaged in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (10 points max)
  • Through the writing of grants, peer-reviewed materials or textbooks, scholarly presentations, curriculum development and other creative activity related to teaching and learning

CANR Excellence in Research Award

  • $3,000 awarded biennially in even-numbered years (i.e. 2018, 2020, 2022, etc.)
  • For eminence in research quality, scientific leadership and mentoring, and service to science
  • Deadline: Students, faculty and staff submit nominations online by March 1 of even-numbered years

Deadline for Submissions: March 1 of even-numbered years

Nomination form

Evaluation Criteria and Rubric

Purpose of the Award

The CANR Excellence in Research Award is awarded biennially in even-numbered years (i.e. 2018, 2020, etc.) The award recognizes individuals that are involved in research that involves the mentoring of graduate students, post-docs, undergraduates, and/or junior faculty. The Evaluation Criteria serve as a guideline for developing the nomination and will be weighted equally in the selection process.

Nature of the Award

  • One award presented biennially in even-numbered years (i.e. 2018, 2020, 2022, etc.).
  • For eminence in research quality, scientific leadership and mentorship, and service to science.
  • The awardee is recognized at the CANR Convocation Ceremony in May and receives:
    • $3,000
    • an award certificate
    • a brick engraved with their name to be placed in the Dunham Garden
  • Deadline: Students, faculty and staff submit nominations online by March 1 of even-numbered years.

Rules of Eligibility for the Award

  • Nominee must be a full-time CANR faculty member.
  • The nominee may mentor graduate students, post-docs, undergraduates, and/or junior faculty.
  • Former recipients of the CANR Excellence in Research Award are ineligible.
  • Nominations must be voluntary.

Process

  • Nominations open December 1 of odd-numbered years and close March 1 of even-numbered years.
  • Nominations are submitted online and should address the Evaluation Criteria.
  • Nominees are notified electronically and must submit a current CV within 7 days of notification.
  • The selection committee is appointed by the dean. The committee evaluates the nomination package (unsolicited nomination letters and the CV) against the Evaluation Criteria/rubric.
  • The award winner is notified electronically by May 1 and is recognized at the CANR Convocation Ceremony in even-numbered years.

 

CANR STAFF AWARDS

CANR Excellence in Service Award (for Administrative Support Staff)

  • $2,000 presented biennially to in odd-numbered years (i.e. 2019, 2021, 2023, etc.)Recognizes superior work ethic, noteworthy performance, outstanding and meritorious service, and positive impact on the goals of the department and CANR.
  • Deadline: Faculty and staff submit nominations online by March 1 of odd-numbered years.

Deadline for Submissions: March 1 of odd-numbered years

Nomination form

The Excellence in Service Award originated in 2015 to recognize staff in administrative and research support roles. Recipients receive a monetary award of $2,000 presented each year at the College’s Convocation in May. A staff member in an administrative support role is recognized in odd-numbered years, and a staff member in a research support role is recognized in even-numbered years.

Nature of the Award

  • One award presented biennially to Administrative Support Staff in odd-numbered years  (i.e. 2019, 2021, etc.).
  • Recognizes individuals for superior work ethic, noteworthy performance, outstanding and meritorious service, and positive impact on the overall goals and objectives of their department and CANR.
  • The awardee is recognized at the CANR Convocation Ceremony in May and receives:
    • $2,000
    • an award certificate
    • a brick engraved with their name to be placed in the Dunham Garden
  • Deadline: Faculty and staff submit nominations online by March 1 of odd-numbered years.

Rules of Eligibility for the Award

  • Nominee must be a full-time CANR staff member and have completed a minimum of three years employment in the college prior to the end of the March 1 deadline.
  • Former recipients of the CANR Excellence in Service Award are ineligible.
  • Nominations must be voluntary.
  • Nominations must include the supervisor’s endorsement.

Process  

  • All faculty and staff may submit nominations.
  • Include examples of nominee’s:
    • a. Superior work ethic;
    • b. Noteworthy performance;
    • c. Outstanding and meritorious service;
    • d. Positive impact(s) on the overall goals and objectives of the department and college.
  • The committee will accept a maximum of (5) letters of support**
  • Nominations may include input from several sources**
  • Submit only one nomination per nominee.
  • A selection committee appointed by the dean will review all nominations and notify the winner by May 1.
  • The selection committee must obtain the endorsement of the nominee’s supervisor.

CANR Excellence in Extension (for Cooperative Extension Professionals)

  • $2,000 awarded biennially in even-numbered years (i.e. 2018, 2020, 2022, etc.)
  • For excellence in Extension educational programming
  • Preliminary​ ​Nominations​ ​are​ ​due​ ​by​ ​December​ ​30 (odd-numbered years)

Deadline for Submissions: Preliminary​ ​Nominations​ ​are​ ​due​ ​by​ ​December​ ​30 (odd-numbered years)

Characteristics​ ​of​ ​Excellence​ ​in​ ​Extension

The​ ​CANR​ ​Excellence​ ​in​ ​Extension​ ​Award​ ​is​ ​based​ ​on​ ​the​ ​ECOP​ ​National​ ​Excellence​ ​in​ ​Extension Award.​ ​The​ ​CANR​ ​Excellence​ ​in​ ​Extension​ ​Award​ ​is​ ​presented​ ​in​ ​even​ ​years​ ​to​ ​an​ ​individual​ ​who has​ ​strived​ ​throughout​ ​his/her​ ​career​ ​to​ ​achieve​ ​the​ ​benchmarks​ ​reflective​ ​of​ ​excellence​ ​in Extension​ ​educational​ ​programming.​ ​​ ​These​ ​include,​ ​but​ ​are​ ​not​ ​limited​ ​to,​ ​demonstration​ ​of high​ ​impact​ ​of​ ​programs;​ ​visionary​ ​leadership​ ​and​ ​anticipation​ ​of​ ​emerging​ ​issues​ ​for​ ​clientele and​ ​the​ ​system;​ ​commitment​ ​to​ ​diversity;​ ​and​ ​integration​ ​of​ ​programs​ ​in​ ​partnerships​ ​with university​ ​colleagues​ ​and​ ​outside​ ​clientele.​ ​​ ​A​ ​successful​ ​award​ ​recipient​ ​should​ ​be​ ​recognized as​ ​a​ ​leader​ ​in​ ​the​ ​university​ ​and​ ​in​ ​the​ ​respective​ ​field​ ​of​ ​expertise.​ ​​ ​Awardees​ ​should demonstrate​ ​the​ ​ability​ ​to​ ​garner​ ​a​ ​continual​ ​flow​ ​of​ ​resources​ ​for​ ​sustainable​ ​Extension programs,​ ​use​ ​innovative​ ​teaching​ ​methods​ ​and​ ​be​ ​recognized​ ​by​ ​peers​ ​and​ ​the​ ​communities served.

Eligibility

The​ ​nominee​ ​must​ ​be​ ​an​ ​active​ ​Cooperative​ ​Extension​ ​System​ ​professional​ ​(state,​ ​and/or county)​ ​with​ ​at​ ​least​ ​50​ ​percent​ ​FTE​ ​university​ ​appointment​ ​in​ ​Extension​ ​(Administrative​ ​FTE >50%​ ​​ ​disqualify​ ​a​ ​nominee)​ ​The​ ​nominee​ ​demonstrates​ ​responsibility​ ​for​ ​Extension programming​ ​for​ ​ten​ ​concurrent​ ​years.​ ​​ ​Nominations​ ​may​ ​be​ ​submitted​ ​by​ ​a​ ​nominee, supervisor,​ ​or​ ​peer.​ ​Past​ ​recipients​ ​of​ ​the​ ​CANR​ ​Excellence​ ​in​ ​Extension​ ​Award​ ​are​ ​ineligible​ ​for this​ ​award.

Nomination​ ​Process

1.​ ​​ ​Letter​ ​of​ ​nominations​ ​may​ ​be​ ​submitted​ ​by​ ​a​ ​nominee,​ ​supervisor,​ ​or​ ​peer.​ ​​ ​This​ ​nomination is​ ​a​ ​brief​ ​paragraph​ ​stating​ ​noteworthy​ ​performance​ ​of​ ​nominee​ ​and​ ​is​ ​submitted​ ​to​ ​identified member​ ​of​ ​Extension​ ​Leadership​ ​Team.

2.​ ​​ ​The​ ​Extension​ ​Leadership​ ​Team​ ​will​ ​select​ ​the​ ​nominees​ ​for​ ​full​ ​application.

3.​ ​​ ​Full​ ​application​ ​includes​ ​examples​ ​of​ ​nominee’s​ ​superior​ ​work​ ​ethic,​ ​noteworthy performance,​ ​outstanding​ ​and​ ​meritorious​ ​service,​ ​positive​ ​impacts​ ​on​ ​the​ ​overall​ ​goals​ ​and objectives​ ​of​ ​the​ ​department​ ​and​ ​college.​ ​​ ​Nominations​ ​could​ ​include​ ​input​ ​from​ ​several sources​ ​and​ ​all​ ​nominees​ ​must​ ​have​ ​a​ ​minimum​ ​of​ ​10​ ​concurrent​ ​years​ ​of​ ​Extension programming​ ​and​ ​employment​ ​in​ ​the​ ​college​ ​prior​ ​to​ ​the​ ​end​ ​of​ ​the​ ​application​ ​deadline.

4.​ ​​ ​A​ ​selection​ ​committee​ ​made​ ​up​ ​of​ ​Friends​ ​of​ ​Extension​ ​and​ ​retirees​ ​will​ ​be​ ​appointed​ ​by​ ​the Extension​ ​Director​ ​and​ ​will​ ​review​ ​full​ ​applications,​ ​and​ ​makes​ ​the​ ​selection.

Selection​ ​Criteria

1.​ ​Demonstrated​ ​high​ ​impact​ ​of​ ​programs;​ ​anticipated​ ​and​ ​responded​ ​to​ ​critical​ ​public​ ​needs with​ ​solutions​ ​on​ ​critical​ ​issues.​ ​​ ​Enhanced​ ​the​ ​public​ ​good​ ​indicated​ ​by​ ​economic,​ ​social​ ​and/or environmental​ ​impact.​ ​35%

2.​ ​​ ​Recognized​ ​excellence​ ​in​ ​one’s​ ​field​ ​of​ ​expertise​ ​as​ ​demonstrated​ ​by​ ​sustained​ ​external funding,​ ​awards,​ ​recognition,​ ​and​ ​request​ ​for​ ​regional/state/national​ ​addresses​ ​and​ ​speaking engagements,;​ ​and​ ​appropriate,​ ​peer​ ​reviewed​ ​publication​ ​of​ ​scholarly​ ​work,​ ​including​ ​journal articles.​ ​​ ​20%

3.​ ​Demonstrated​ ​innovation​ ​in​ ​partnerships,​ ​funding​ ​and​ ​educational​ ​program​ ​delivery.​ ​​ ​20%

4.​ ​Ability​ ​to​ ​engage​ ​university​ ​colleagues​ ​in​ ​Extension​ ​programming​ ​with​ ​evidence​ ​of leadership,​ ​teamwork,​ ​and​ ​mentoring​ ​both​ ​within​ ​and​ ​outside​ ​Extension​ ​15%

5.​ ​Demonstrated​ ​conveyance​ ​of​ ​cultural​ ​competencies​ ​and​ ​appreciation​ ​for​ ​diversity.​ ​​ ​10%

 

Timeline

December​ ​of​ ​odd​ ​year​ ​award​ ​announced

Selection​ ​Committee​ ​appointed​ ​by​ ​the​ ​Director​ ​of​ ​Extension​ ​by​ ​January​ ​1

Preliminary​ ​Nominations​ ​are​ ​due​ ​by​ ​December​ ​30

Extension​ ​Leadership​ ​Team​ ​selects​ ​finalists​ ​for​ ​full​ ​application​ ​by​ ​January​ ​15

Full​ ​applications​ ​are​ ​due​ ​by​ ​February​ ​15

Selection​ ​committee​ ​will​ ​make​ ​their​ ​decision​ ​and​ ​notify​ ​the​ ​winners​ ​by​ ​March​ ​31

Awards​ ​presented​ ​at​ ​College​ ​Convocation​ ​in​ ​May

CANR Excellence in Service Award (for Research Support Staff)

  • $2,000 presented biennially in even-numbered years (i.e. 2018, 2020, 2022, etc.)
  • Recognizes superior work ethic, noteworthy performance, outstanding and meritorious service, and positive impact on the goals of the department and CANR.
  • Deadline: Faculty and staff submit nominations online by March 1 of even-numbered years

Deadline for Submissions: March 1 of even-numbered years

Nomination form

The Excellence in Service Award originated in 2015 to recognize staff in administrative and research support roles. Recipients receive a monetary award of $2,000 presented each year at the College’s Convocation in May. A staff member in an administrative support role is recognized in odd-numbered years, and a staff member in a research support role is recognized in even-numbered years.

Nature of the Award

  • One award presented biennially to Research Support Staff in even-numbered years  (i.e. 2018, 2020, 2022, etc.).
  • Recognizes individuals for superior work ethic, noteworthy performance, outstanding and meritorious service, and positive impact on the overall goals and objectives of their department and CANR.
  • The awardee is recognized at the CANR Convocation Ceremony in May and receives:
    • $2,000
    • an award certificate
    • a brick engraved with their name to be placed in the Dunham Garden
  • Deadline: Faculty and staff submit nominations online by March 1 of even-numbered years.

Rules of Eligibility for the Award

  • Nominee must be a full-time CANR staff member and have completed a minimum of three years employment in the college prior to the end of the March 1 deadline.
  • Former recipients of the CANR Excellence in Service Award are ineligible.
  • Nominations must be voluntary.
  • Nominations must include the supervisor’s endorsement.

Process  

  • CANR faculty and staff may submit nominations.
  • Include examples of nominee’s:
    • a. Superior work ethic;
    • b. Noteworthy performance;
    • c. Outstanding and meritorious service;
    • d. Positive impact(s) on the overall goals and objectives of the department and college.
  • The committee will accept a maximum of (5) letters of support.
  • Nominations may include input from several sources.
  • Submit only one nomination per nominee.
  • A selection committee appointed by the dean will review all nominations and notify the winner by May 1.

The selection committee must obtain the endorsement of the nominee’s supervisor.

CANR GRADUATE STUDENT AWARDS

CANR William J Benton Graduate Student Award

  • Two annual awards, $500 each, presented to two graduate students (one PhD and one MS)
  • For excellence in research and outstanding accomplishments and service to their profession
  • Deadline: the graduate student’s major advisor may submit nominations online by March 16

Deadline for Submissions: March 16

Nomination form

The William J. Benton Graduate Student Award was established in honor of Dr. William J. Benton, in recognition of his dedication to graduate education. Dr. Benton served the University as CANR Associate Dean of Research, Associate Director of the University of Delaware Agricultural Experiment Station, and Professor in the Department of Animal and Food Sciences. In these diverse roles, Dr. Benton’s commitment to graduate education and support of excellence in graduate student research were widely recognized and greatly appreciated by CANR faculty and graduate students.

The award is presented annually to two graduate students (one Ph.D. and one M.S.) who have achieved Dr. Benton’s high standards of graduate education. College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (CANR) graduate students who have excelled in research and have an outstanding record of academic accomplishments and service to their profession are eligible for nomination. Award selection is based on student accomplishments during their current degree program, and does not include separate accomplishments in the field completed as employees or research professionals.

Nature of the Award

  • Two awards presented annually to one MS student and one PhD student.
  • Awardees are recognized at the CANR Convocation Ceremony in May and receive a plaque and $500.
  • Deadline: submit nominations online by March 16.

Rules of Eligibility & Process

  • Nominees must have a minimum GPA of 3.5 and be in the final year of their graduate degree program
  • Eligible candidates cannot have already graduated from the University of Delaware
  • Complete the nomination form online and submit with all required materials:
    • Nomination letter from the Graduate Student’s Major Advisor which clearly indicates accomplishments associated with the student’s current degree program;
    • Graduate Student’s curriculum vitae;
    • Graduate Student’s unofficial UD transcript and the transcripts from the previous institutions where they were enrolled in a graduate program.
  • The award recipients will be selected by the CANR Research Advisory Committee
  • Awards will be presented by the Dean and Department Chair of the recipient at an event in May

Sustainability at CANR

The University of Delaware’s College of Agriculture & Natural Resources recognizes the importance of sustainability as an outcome in education campus-wide. CANR majors which teach and encourage sustainability include:
  • Animal Science – exploring ways to produce food given the complex relationship between the health of domestic animals, humans and our shared environment.
  • Environmental and Resource Economics  (optional concentration in sustainable development) –  focuses on allocating resources for the benefit of present and future generations and the international dimensions of such challenges across countries and cultures. 
  • Food Science – exploring ways to grow, process, package, preserve and utilize food in ways that make the food safe, nutritious, affordable and available with a minimal environmental impact and waste generation.
  • Insect Ecology and Conservation – study of the most abundant creatures on Earth—insects—and their interactions with other wildlife, humans, and the environment.
  • Landscape Architecture – combines science, technology, art and creative problem solving with a love of nature and the world outdoors. This professional program emphasizes design of outdoor spaces that are safe, aesthetically pleasing, and environmentally sustainable.
  • Landscape Horticulture and Design –  fuses the creative aspects of art and design with the technical and scientific aspects of horticulture. The discipline involves the analysis, planning, design, implementation and management of sustainable natural and constructed environments.
  • Natural Resource Management – an interdisciplinary approach to manage and sustain natural and environmental resources globally.
  • Plant Science –  applies the principles of agriculture, biology and chemistry to plant life in horticultural, agricultural, and natural settings with an emphasis on maintaining a safe, aesthetically pleasing, and sustainable environment.
  • Wildlife Ecology and Conservation – examines all non-domesticated animals and the challenges they face sharing the planet with humans.

Diversity

Mission Statement: The College of Agriculture and Natural Resources is committed to promoting an inclusive and supportive environment for all faculty, staff, and students. The CANR Diversity Committee is actively developing activities, training, and programming aligned with UD’s Diversity Action Plan.

Feedback: The College of Agriculture and Natural Resources welcomes your comments, questions, and feedback via the link below. feedbackbutton

 

 

Related Resources

Borel Global Fellows

Aim and Scope: The College of Agriculture and Natural Resources at the University of
Delaware has partnered with AGRA (Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa) to build a
Master’s degree program to train African students in plant breeding, crop protection, soil
science, agricultural economics, microbiology, wildlife management, and entomology and other areas vital to food security in Africa. Made possible by a generous gift from Jim and Marcia Borel, the program provides opportunities for one to two students per year to complete an MS degree at the University of Delaware while conducting research in their home country in an area of critical need.

Current Focus: In response to identified needs in Africa, the 2018 focal areas are 1) plant
breeding and genetics, 2) agricultural economics, 3) soil science, 4) microbiology, 5) wildlife ecology, and 6) entomology. Of particular interest are projects that will lead to improvements in smallholder farm productivity.

Program: Students will be recommended to start at the University of Delaware during the
summer to acclimate and begin involvement in research coursework (as much as 3 months in advance of the first semester). Following this, students will spend the next 12 to 18 months completing course work, developing research skills, and beginning a research project to be completed upon return to their home country. Students will spend six to eight months in their home country completing their research. The faculty mentor will travel to Africa during this period to help prepare the student for their thesis defense.

Criteria, Eligibility:

  • African students with a BS degree (or equivalent) in plant science, agronomy, horticulture, agricultural economics, wildlife ecology, entomology, soil science or microbiology or related discipline.
  • 3-5 years of work experience post-graduation in the agricultural sector.
  • A sincere and demonstrable passion to return to the home country and contribute to
    agricultural development, increased food security, and/or agribusiness development.
  • A letter of commitment from an African research institute, or university pledging to provide the fellow with in-kind research support for the African portion of their fellowship.
  • English language proficiency.
  • Acceptable scores on the GRE and TOEFL exams.
  • Ability to obtain a student visa (F-1) and travel to the USA from the home country.
  • Access to the internet in the home country.
  • For field research, access to appropriate resources for the student in Africa will be made by the faculty mentor.

How to apply: Candidates that hold a position in a scientific organization (e.g. university,
national program, international non-profit organization, etc.) in Kenya, Tanzania, Malawi,
Zimbabwe and Uganda are being considered at this time. A two-stage application process is required for the program. Before applying to UD’s graduate program, send the following
documents directly to AGRA (JNaibei@agra.org) with the subject line “Borel Global Fellows
Program.”

1) Statement of interest (2-page max)
2) Resume or curriculum vitae
3) Undergraduate transcripts
4) Up to three letters of reference from individuals who can judge your scholastic capability
and potential for research at the graduate level
5) A letter of commitment from an African research institute, or university pledging to provide the fellow with in-kind research support for the African portion of their fellowship
Following the first stage evaluation by AGRA, candidates will be invited to apply to the
University of Delaware. Details regarding UD’s graduate school admission can be found at: http://www.udel.edu/gradoffice/apply/

When to apply: The deadline for applications to AGRA is March 22, 2019. Applicants selected for further consideration will be notified by May 15, 2019 regarding how to make a formal application to the University of Delaware.

Financial support provided by the University of Delaware: Each Borel Global Fellow will
receive generous financial support including:

  • A stipend to cover living expenses while in Delaware (stipends vary by program; current minimum is $18,000/year)
  • A stipend of $1,125 per month covering up to eight months support for the African “in residence” portion of the fellowship.
  • A full waiver of tuition for up to 33 credits (currently valued at ~$53,000)
  • Round trip airfare to/from the USA (economy class)
  • Computer allowance of up to $1,000 (to be purchased at Delaware)
  • Reimbursement for the UD application fee ($75)
  • Financial support and travel allowance for the UD faculty mentor

Students are responsible for purchasing their own health insurance upon arrival to the
university; for details, costs and options, see: http://www.udel.edu/gradoffice/polproc/
insurance.html

AGcelerate

UDsecondarylockup_AGEP

 

MISSION

Committed to diversity and inclusion, the AGcelerate Enrichment Program provides a supportive environment to promote the academic success, leadership development, and career preparedness for students in all majors of the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources. Participants develop a broad skill set and a close network of friends and mentors to ensure success both during and following their time at the University of Delaware.

The AGcelerate Enrichment Program offers tailored support for academic and professional success of students through:

  • Academic development and support
  • Math and chemistry tutoring on South Campus
  • Faculty Networking
  • Peer Mentoring
  • Career and internship exploration
  • Social and service learning activities

 

A bit more about us…

The AGcelerate Enrichment Program does not hold weekly or monthly meetings which student members are required to attend. Instead, our services and events are here for you when you need them- feel free to attend as many or as few as fit your schedule and benefit you. If there is academic support you need that we do not currently offer, let us know! We are always able to point you to available resources campus wide.

CHECK OUT WHAT WE’RE UP TO THIS SEMESTER ON THE SIDE BAR!

 

(above: Start the Semester Right Night)

 

 

Fischer Greenhouse Laboratory Growth Chamber Facility Reservation Form

 

To check availability of the growth chambers click to see their respective calendar.

Growth Chamber Descriptions
Chamber #1 (calendar)
Percival reach in model # I-60 LL
24 ft./sq. of shelve space
20 Watt T-12 fluorescent lights
Temperature and light control
Chamber #2 (calendar)
Percival reach in model # -60 LL VL
24 ft./sq. of shelve space
20 Watt T-12 fluorescent lights and 32 Watt T-8 fluorescent lights
Temperature and light control
Chamber #3 (calendar)
Percival reach in model # AR-75 L
16 ft./sq. of shelve space
32 Watt T-8 fluorescent lights and 40 Watt incandescent lights
Temperature and light control
Chamber #4 (calendar)
Conviron walk in model # TCR-240
96 ft./sq. of shelve space
59 Watt fluorescent and 40 watt incandescent lights
Temperature, light and humidity control
Chamber #5 (calendar) Conviron walk in model # C-10 10 M
96 ft./sq. shelve space
32 Watt T-8 florescent lights
Temperature, light and humidity control
Chamber #6 (calendar)
Conviron walk in model # C- 10 10 M
96 ft./sq.. shelve space
Lumigrow Lumibar L.E.D. lights
Temperature, light and humidity control
Chamber #7 (calendar)

Conviron walk in model # C-10 10 M
64 ft./sq. shelve space
54 Watt T-5 H/O florescent lights and 40 Watt incandescent lights
Temperature, light and humidity control
Chamber #8 (calendar)
Conviron reach in model # MTR 30
24 ft./sq. shelve space
72 Watt T-12 fluorescent lights and 40 Watt incandescent lights
Temperature, light and humidity control
Chamber #9 (calendar)
Conviron reach in model # PGC 20
16 ft./sq. of floor space (no shelves)
400 Watt metal halide lights and 400 Watt high pressure sodium lights
Temperature, light and humidity control


Please select a valid form

Giving

Gifts from individuals, companies, and foundations provide the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (CANR) with needed resources to expand our educational, research and extension programs. These vital gifts support faculty in their cutting edge research, and help train the next generation of leaders who will work to feed the world and sustain our natural resources.

Your gift may be designated to the department or fund of your choice with the confidence that it will be used for the purpose you intend. The College’s giving opportunities are described below.

Annual Support

College and departments

CANR utilizes unrestricted funds to support initiatives like:

  • Student Enrichment—Opportunities for student learning outside of the classroom, including internships with Landscape Architecture, Botanic Gardens, Wetlands Restoration, Extension and the UDairy Creamery
  • Special Projects—Unique learning opportunities (e.g. UDairy Creamery or UD Fresh to You) that engage and  enrich the local community and give students real-world experiences invaluable to their careers
  • Scholarships—Academic and need-based awards that keep students focused on their education rather than how they can finance it
  • Graduate Student Support—Opportunities for students to participate in knowledge discovery  and translation that help feed the world and protect the planet
  • Farm Operations—Critical support of the college’s 350-acre farm, dairy, wetlands and woodlands that serves as an outdoor laboratory for students and faculty
  • Cooperative Extension—Collaborative work between UD and the local community to provide valuable consultation and education to individuals, businesses and communities to solve problems, develop skills and build a better future.

Gifts can be directed to CANR and to each of our departments, centers and programs:

Major Gift Support

Capital Projects and Needs

Cooperative Extension exists to extend knowledge and change lives in four areas of focus: 4H & Youth Development; Agriculture and Natural Resources; Lawn and Garden; and Family & Consumer Sciences. UD celebrated the 100th Anniversary of Cooperative Extension nationwide in 2014, we created a Centennial Fund to support a variety of operational needs associated with our extension efforts in New Castle, Kent and Sussex counties. These needs may include staff support, programmatic support, and innovation of new programs and delivery methods.  Learn more about the UD Cooperative Extension’s Centennial Fund.

Special projects that impact CANR Students:

UDairy Creamery established in 2008, produces premium ice cream made with milk from the cows on the farm at UD’s College of Agriculture & Natural Resources.  Founded on science, sustainability and entrepreneurship, the Creamery:

  • Focuses on sustaining agriculture and natural ecosystems in the face of land use change;
  • Is a student-centered, faculty supported enterprise;
  • Cuts across many UD colleges and disciplines in its educational efforts; and 
  • Reaches out to the community and engages alumni.

UD Botanic Gardens (UDBG) – a series of twelve gardens on fifteen acres, UDBG serves as a research center, a laboratory, and a classroom in which studies in plant biology, botany, plant pathology, landscape design, ornamental horticulture, and entomology are pursued through experiential learning.  UDBG also maintains a diverse and dynamic living plant collection that stimulates and engages, with more than 3,000 species and cultivars of perennials, shrubs and trees.

Facilities
Housing CANR teaching and research laboratories.
Worrilow Hall houses CANR teaching and research laboratories.

Worrilow Hall, constructed in 1980, serves as the College of Agriculture & Natural Resources’ primary research and teaching facility.  Renovations to this vital space will greatly support the College in its goals to: increase undergraduate and graduate enrollment; increase faculty prominence and research; increase hands on problem based learning and instructional opportunities for undergraduate CANR students; promote interdisciplinary research and collaboration with partners outside of the college; increase and maintain a sustainable research funding stream.  The college is currently working with architects on renovation plans for Worrilow Hall.

Endowed (permanent) Funds

student-feeding-calfUndergraduate Enrichment Funds are used to support outstanding students by offering valuable paid research opportunities.  Recipients of enrichment funds receive a unique opportunity to work alongside faculty in solving current and challenging research problems by combining classroom concepts with real-world implications.

Undergraduate Scholarships provide tuition assistance to students who demonstrate exceptional merit based academic promise or financial need with specific criteria determined by the donor. The University’s annual Celebration of Scholarship program affords the opportunity for donors to meet the recipients of the scholarships and awards.

Graduate Fellowships provide nine-month stipends of $22,500 for first-year graduate students, essential for the recruitment of top doctoral students.

Career Development Professorships provide an annual stipend of $50,000 used to recruit and retain talented young faculty. The stipend complements their compensation with funds for special research, speaking engagements, conferences and publications.

Endowed Professorships & Endowed Chairs are highly prized by outstanding faculty due to their prestige and academic value. Presently, 7 percent of CANR faculty hold named professorships. An Endowed Professorship/Chair is a most coveted position with funds providing a portion of the professor’s annual expenses.

The University Board of Trustees sets the endowment income expenditure rate. Currently the spending rate is approximately 4.0 percent.

Does my company have a matching gifts program? I’d like to give now!

CANR Campus

The College of Agriculture and Natural Resources has two major teaching, research, and extension complexes: one on the UD Newark Campus and the other in Sussex County. Numerous, additional lands and facilities throughout the state support the college’s efforts. With our “350-acre classroom” just steps from UD’s main campus, we can provide hands on experience with animals, crop plants, wetlands, forest, greenhouses and more for every student in every program.

Townsend Hall
Townsend Hall

Townsend Hall

Townsend Hall - Housing CANR administrative, departmental and faculty offices, laboratories and teaching rooms.

Worrilow Hall
Worrilow Hall

Worrilow Hall

Housing CANR teaching and research laboratories.

UD Dairy
UD Dairy

UD Dairy

Providing faculty and students close proximity to a real-life, working dairy farm that serves as a model for environmental best management practices.

Fischer Greenhouse Laboratory
Fischer Greenhouse Laboratory

Fischer Greenhouse Laboratory

A professionally-managed suite of growth chambers and glass house facilities serving the research and education community. More here: http://canr.udel.edu/fischer-greenhouse/

Webb Farm
Webb Farm

Webb Farm

The Webb Farm, located off of Route 72 in Newark, houses facilities for the college’s registered Angus cattle herd, Dorset sheep flock and horse herd; and includes a lambing barn, livestock arena and the new equine facility.

Equine Teaching Facility
Equine Teaching Facility

Equine Teaching Facility

A new facility used for equine science courses, to provide continuing education opportunities for local and regional equine veterinarians, and to support Extension outreach efforts for Delaware's growing equine industry.

Ecology Woods
Ecology Woods

Ecology Woods

35 acres of forested lands used for research and teaching in the areas of ecology, entomology, and wildlife conservation.

CANR Analytical Laboratories
CANR Analytical Laboratories

CANR Analytical Laboratories

UD-CANR has a variety of laboratories that provide analytical services to members of the public and university communities.

Natural Resources Area
Natural Resources Area

Natural Resources Area

Including a 10-acre warm season prairie recently established to restore an old landfill, two wildflower meadows, and numerous wetlands and stream corridors.

Apiaries
Apiaries

Apiaries

An area where beehives are kept for use in entomological research, teaching, and extension, and as a source of pollinators for local croplands.

Allen Biotechnology Laboratory
Allen Biotechnology Laboratory

Allen Biotechnology Laboratory

A world class research laboratory used to address basic and applied research in infectious diseases with emphasis on epidemiology, pathogenesis, vaccine development and evaluation.

Delaware Biotech Institute
Delaware Biotech Institute

Delaware Biotech Institute

Our Institute is the physical home to a number of research laboratories with scientists, students, and faculty working on problems related to agriculture, human health, and energy and the environment.

New Castle County Cooperative Extension
New Castle County Cooperative Extension

New Castle County Cooperative Extension

The hub for Cooperative Extension programming in New Castle County

UDairy Creamery
UDairy Creamery

UDairy Creamery

An ice cream manufacturing facility and storefront exists for students to learn business management and make ice cream from the milk of our own dairy cows!

University of Delaware Botanic Gardens
University of Delaware Botanic Gardens

University of Delaware Botanic Gardens

Wetland Creation Site
Wetland Creation Site

Wetland Creation Site

In September of 2008, a wetland was installed on the UD Farm, in what was once a pasture for dairy cows. While the primary goal of this project is to improve water quality and enhance habitat, the site will also be used for research and teaching related to water quality, soils, ecology, and horticulture.

Paradee Center
Paradee Center

Paradee Center

The Kent County hub for Cooperative Extension programming for the University, business, government, and civic and corporate institutions throughout the county.

Carvel Research and Education Center
Carvel Research and Education Center

Carvel Research and Education Center

The hub for Sussex County Cooperative Extension housing educators and agents who provide educational programming, 325 acres of farmland for agronomic research, and 35 acres of natural areas.

Lasher Laboratory
Lasher Laboratory

Lasher Laboratory

Georgetown-The primary poultry diagnostic laboratory in the State, providing rapid and comprehensive diagnostic services to commercial poultry producers as well as to the owners of small non-commercial hobby and backyard flocks.

Rieger, Mark

This is the faculty profile for Mark Rieger, Dean and Professor in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources at the University of Delaware.

Contact Us

Location

531 South College Avenue
Townsend Hall
Newark, Delaware 19716-2103
(302) 831-2501

Current and future undergraduate students

Kimberly Yackoski, Sr. Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Services
Email: anr-academics@udel.edu
Phone: (302) 831-2508

Graduate students

University of Delaware Office of Graduate & Professional Education

Public & Media Relations

Dante LaPenta, Communications Manager
Email: dlapenta@udel.edu
Phone: (302) 831-1355

Cooperative Extension

Michelle Rodgers, Associate Dean and Director of Cooperative Extension and Outreach
Phone: (302) 831-2504
Fax: (302) 831-6758

New Castle County Office
461 Wyoming Road
Newark, DE 19716
Phone: (302) 831-2506
Fax: (302) 831-8934

Kent County Office
University of Delaware Paradee Center
69 Transportation Circle
Dover , DE 19901
Phone: (302) 730-4000
Fax: (302) 735-8130
Mail Code: D270

Sussex County Office
Elbert N. and Ann V. Carvel Research and Education Center
16483 County Seat Highway
Georgetown , DE 19947
Phone: (302) 856-7303
Fax: (302) 856-1845
Mail code: S890

A Message from the Dean

dean-rieger-students-forum

There has never been a more immediate and pressing need for agriculture and natural resource professionals than now. The current generation of professionals entering the workplace must find ways to double food production without increasing the amount of land and water devoted to agriculture – truly one of the world’s grand challenges.  The students who enroll in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (CANR) want more than just jobs; they want careers that matter and provide opportunities to make a difference in the world. I can’t think of nobler professions than those dedicated to preserving our earth for future generations.

We take great pride that about 94% of our College’s recent graduates secured jobs in their fields of study with starting salaries in the range of $35,000 – $45,000. The median salaries are higher than those for more popular college majors such as biology, psychology, education, political science, and the arts and humanities. In fact, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) reports that there are two jobs to every graduate of agriculture and related sciences.

You might also be interested to know that more than a quarter of graduates from colleges of agriculture and related sciences go on to earn a graduate or professional degree, where annual earnings can even double. Molecular biology, animal science, population ecology, natural resource management, food science, applied economics and statistics, water quality, and wildlife conservation are just some of the high-demand programs that we offer. Our graduate programs provide a pathway to academia, industry and agency careers for those whose goal it is to lead change in agriculture and environmental issues.

Thousands of successful alumni around the world are evidence of the academic excellence rooted at the College of Agriculture & Natural Resources.  A committed and renowned faculty engages students with hands-on experiences, research opportunities and connections to communities, both at home and overseas. With a distinctive “350-acre classroom,” our Newark Farm students gain practical experience by actively testing their knowledge in real-world settings.  We are proud to be one of only a handful of colleges in the nation that actually feature a working farm right on its campus. Our student farm, however, is more than that – it offers woodlands, wetlands, streams, grasslands, equine and large animal facilities, a working dairy, as well as a creamery. Aiding the community also continues to be at the cornerstone of CANR. Now more than ever, UD Cooperative Extension, the outreach arm of the College, shares knowledge with those citizens who need it most — especially as it relates to today’s high stakes regarding health, nutrition and financial literacy.

Making a world of difference has never been more important. We invite you to learn more about us and schedule a visit. We’ll be glad to work with you to chart a path to a meaningful, well-paying career. Feed the world. Protect the planet. That’s the motto we live by. Join us.

Sincerely,

 

Mark Rieger, Ph.D.
Dean

About Us

Our college is an educationally rich environment bursting with life and learning, and where students are invited and encouraged to be full partners in their education.  As an undergraduate student, we will strongly encourage you to question, to discuss, and to develop the expertise necessary to formulate solutions to real world challenges in whatever career you pursue.

We hope you find everything you need on our website. If you have further questions please feel free contact us.

Latest CANR News

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Bais, Harsh

This is the faculty profile page for Harsh Bais, Associate Professor in Plant and Soil Sciences with the College of Agriculture & Natural Resources at the University of Delaware.

Harsh Bais studies rhizosphere biology research which is focused on understanding the biological significance of root exudation.

Messer, Kent

This is the faculty profile for Professor Kent Messer, S. Hallock DuPont Professor of Applied Economics and Director, Center for Experimental & Applied Economics.

Krishnan, Palaniappa

This is the faculty profile for Krishnan Palaniappa Associate Professor in Applied Economics and Statistics in the College of Ag & Natural Resources at UD.

Bernard, John

This is the faculty profile page for John Bernard Professor of Applied Economics and Statistics at the University of Delaware.

Dare to Bee Honey

The Teaching Apiary

The UD apiary is home to twenty-two hives translating to some five million honey bees, providing pollination services to the surrounding fields and gardens. The resident honeybees are an active part of the teaching, research and outreach programs in the Department of Entomology and Wildlife Ecology.

Debbie Delaney
Debbie Delaney

Deborah Delaney, assistant professor of entomology and wildlife ecology, who oversees the apiary and bee program, teaches ENWC 224, the beekeeping class, where each student stewards their own hive and learns bee biology and beekeeping skills. Students are encouraged to help with honey harvest and extraction and Delaney is currently trying to secure grant monies for a master’s student project that would utilize the colonies in the apiary.

The apiary is also used for outreach events for Master Gardeners, the Delaware Beekeepers Association and other organizations.  Delaney actively participates in demonstrations and other educational events with her bees.

Making Honey

Bees ApiaryThe honey is made by the bees starting early in the spring as soon as the first trees start to bloom (most likely maples). Bees collect nectar and pollen from the various floral sources over the spring and summer months.

Honey changes from year to year, depending on the amount of rainfall during the season and what flowers are producing the nectar.

The bees on the Newark farm get a large amount of floral resources from black locust.  There are also later flows that are a chaotic mix of things, but mainly clover, tulip poplar and a variety of other wild flowers. Late August up until early fall, they are bringing in goldenrod, aster and many non-native floral sources such as knotweeds. These nectars, and finally honey, tend to be much darker in color and have a rich flavor.

Once the forager bee brings the nectar back to the hive the nectar will have been mixed with special enzymes the foraging bee produces, but it is about 80-90% water at this time. Once the forager bee transfers the nectar to a house bee, the house bee spreads it in the bottom of a wax honeycomb cell and the process of evaporating the water out of the nectar begins. They will fan the nectar until the water content reaches about 19%, when they will cap the honey filled cells with a thin wax layer.

Bees HoneyThis capping lets the beekeepers know it is ready to harvest and is now truly honey. If honey was harvested before this capping occurred the honey would ferment because the water content would be too high.

Once the honey is capped, Delaney and her crew of students go through each hive frame by frame, and gently brush off the bees and put the capped honey into a bee proof box for transportation to the extraction room.

They then start the process of removing those wax cappings which the bees spent so much energy creating. By removing the cappings the honey is free to flow from the wax cells.

Once the cappings are removed on both sides of the honeycomb we put the frames of honey into a motorized 18-frame extractor. The extractor spins the frames very quickly, which causes the honey to be spun onto the walls of the extractor.  The honey then drips down the walls into the bottom of the extractor barrel and spills out into a double sieve or filter that removes any wax pieces and bee parts. The sieve is placed over a food grade bucket and once full is poured into our bottling tank ready for bottling and labeling.

Graduate Programs

Graduate programs in the University of Delaware’s College of Agriculture and Natural Resources are characterized by the aggressive recruitment of high quality students from major U.S. and international universities, highly competitive graduate stipends, travel opportunities for research projects and participation in professional meetings worldwide. College faculty conduct cutting-edge research in basic and applied disciplines and are personally committed to the success of their graduate students.

More than 50 research centers and institutes at the University of Delaware support the research interests and activity of our faculty and students.  Of those 50, eight are led by faculty members of the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources.  The college’s unique setting offers access to laboratories using cutting edge technologies as well as the college’s 350-acre agro-ecosystem.

The graduate program coordinator in each department can serve as a contact for further information.